Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5PM – 8PM

September 1, 2017

Caneva da Nani Prosecco Col Fondo

These are the notes Wine Wizard Kat Cummings wrote a few months back, after her trip to Italy with SelectioNaturel. We’re using them again! Caneva da Nani’s Prosecco Col Fondo is made from 40 yr old glera vines grown the village of Guia high up in the Valdobbiadene of the Veneto. As glera is very vigorous, the Canello family find good equilibrium in pruning to four sticks, and produce 135 hectoliters/hectare (farming 4.5 hectares total). Soil is heavy clay (argile) on steep terraced hillsides.

Fermentation is done in glass lined cement tanks made in the 1960s. Massimo does very few rackings (2-3), choosing to stir the lees in lieu of racking or adding sulfites. Plus the biscotto di afreddimento! I just love the idea of a cooling cookie inside these epic cement tanks.

70% of Caneva’s production goes into their col fondo wine, although they also make a brut and a metodo clasico. Selection is done in the cellar, and they choose the base wine for col fondo by looking for a wine that can go through malolactic fermentation and finish dry. So they are looking for base wine with more body, that is softer and rounder.

They do multiple bottling runs because of space (or lack thereof), with the first bottling at end of December and last at end of May. The col fondo referments in bottle, on the lees, in 30 days stored in the cellar at 17-19 degrees celsius (basically they just crank the heat in the cantina and let the yeasts do their work). It needs a full 60 days to go through malo (which gets rid of harsh acids and absorbs the funky yogurt aromas), then finishes with 3 atmospheres of pressure.

I LOVE this wine because of its ethereal quality, it has a soft persistent bubble like a gentle cloud. It’s all pear and green apple and stone fruit and saffron, and develops an interesting salinity the longer it is aged in bottle. Plus it’s so good with a meat party.

The rest of the notes are mostly from the importer, Selections de la Viña.

Cerro La Barca Vegas Altas Eva de los Santos, Ribera del Guadiana, Spain

Ribera del Guadiana is in Extremadura, a region located in south-western Spain on the border of Portugal. Extramadura has been known as a place for bulk wine production, but some pioneers are finding unique new wines here. Cerro La Barca is the first organic producer in the region. They have 38 hectares of Tempranillo and the nearly extinct Eva de los Santos.

Juan Sojo and Ángel Luis González are like brothers from different mothers. One minute they’re arguing and the next they’re toasting to another harvest. They studied oenology together and ever since have been making wines together. Ángel Luis comes from a background in agriculture while Juan comes from a background in science. Both so different, but yet complement each other so well.

Fermented using indigenous yeasts in stainless steel vats where the wines naturally decant without filtration until bottling. The Eva de los Santos is from vines that are up to 80 years old. It’s flowery, fruity and perfumed on the nose, but the palate is a little more intense, with a pronounced crushed stone quality.

Cerro La Barca Vegas Altas Tempranillo, Ribera del Guadiana, Spain

Fermented using indigenous yeasts in stainless steel vats where the wines naturally decant without filtration until bottling.

This is an everyday priced winner. Dry and fruity with pleasant tannins. Good for grilling and swilling.

Companon Arrieta Rioja Alavesa “Herrigoia” Tempranillo, 2016

Who would have thought that when we started our company we would import wines from Rioja? Not us, that’s for sure. In a sense the Bordeaux of Spain, it’s a region that never really caught our attention. There’s a few historic houses that haven’t changed over the years and have maintained their identity by making wines the same way over generations but the rest are questionable. We tried but finding wines that moved us and weren’t taken already was a difficult task, like finding a needle in a haystack. Luckily, along the wine route we stumbled across Gorka and Itxaso of Compañón Arrieta. They are at the head of a rejuvenation of the region, young winegrowers recovering their families old vineyards and making wines like they used to.

Their estate is made up of 4 ha spread across 17 mini parcels, all of which bush pruned vines averaging 50 years of age under organic certification. These vineyards have been in their family for three generations but it wasn’t until 1982 that they built their bodega and started making wine. Unfortunately they weren’t bottling it, but selling it in bulk to some of the bigger houses like CVNE, El Coto, Marqués de Riscal, etc. In 2010, with Gorka and Itxaso at the helm, they started bottling their own wines under the Herrigoia label. The name is a reference to the part of Lanciego where their bodega and most of their vineyards are located. In Basque herri means town and goia means up, translated let’s just say it means uptown higher grounds resulting in fresh wines with great acidity.

Herrigoia is mostly Tempranillo, with some Viura and Malvasia, made via carbonic maceration. Delicious with cured meat and poultry.

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