Tag Archives: Cerro La Barca

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5pm – 8pm

March 9, 2018

Elvio Tintero Vino Rosato 2017

Cantine Elvio Tintero was founded in 1900 by Frenchman Pierre Tintero, when he happened upon the small estate while looking for work in Piedmont. The vineyards were already being worked alone by a young widow named Rosina. The two married, had children, and the estate remains in the same family today. The vines are sustainably farmed and all vinification is in stainless steel.

This is a blend of 90% Barbera, 5% Moscato, and 5% Favorita from young vines grown on clay, limestone, and tufa. It’s a light, lively, and refreshing frizzante with just a touch of pleasant sweetness that’s offset by tart acidity. It’s the perfect summer slurper, but it’s usually sold out by June. This wine is produced and bottled by vintage, but because Tintero sources from different parts of Piedmont, there is no specific DOC, and therefore vintage dating is not allowed. It’s bottled unfiltered.

Iapetus Geocratic Vermont Wine ‘Substrata’ 2016

Iapetus is a new experimental, place-driven project for winemaker Ethan Joseph of Shelburne Vineyards, in Shelburne, VT (just south of Burlington, it would make a for a fun weekend getaway!). Iapetus is the name of an ancient ocean that once covered the present-day Champlain Valley; Substrata refers to the complex matrix of ancient geologic debris in which the vines are grown.

This lovely, hazy white is 100% Louise Swenson (planted in 2006) from McCabe’s Brook Vineyard. The grapes were destemmed and crushed, then soaked on the skins for several hours in tank. The juice is then racked into three Hungarian oak barrels to spontaneously ferment; one of these barrels is new, and the other two are both one-year old. The wine is bottled unfiltered and unfined. This is a mesmerizing wine with compelling, endlessly appealing aromatics. Only 71 cases were produced.

Bodegas Cerro la Barca Vegas Altas Tempranillo 2015

Ribera del Guadiana is in Extremadura, a region located in south-western Spain on the border of Portugal. Extramadura has been known as a place for bulk wine production, but some pioneers are finding unique new wines here. Cerro La Barca is the first organic producer in the region. They have 38 hectares of Tempranillo and the nearly extinct Eva de los Santos. The Tempranillo is from a vineyard of shallow slate that makes tilling difficult, so legumes were planted amongst the vines. Just before sprouting, the legumes are mowed and incorporated into the soil, creating a green cover, and adding to the vineyard’s biodiversity. This is the only work that is done in the vineyard. Harvest is by hand, at night.

This is a delicious, bang-for-you-buck wine. It’s medium-bodied and a touch spicy, with notes of licorice and strawberries.

Librandi Cirò Duca San Felice Riserva 2013, Calabria, Italy

Librandi is a large family winery founded in 1950 by Antonio and Nicodemo Librandi, and now operated by Nicodemo, his two sons Paolo and Raffaele, his nephew Francesco, and his niece Teresa. It’s located between the sea and the Sila Mountains, in Calabria’s Cirò DOC, in the toe of Italy’s boot. The Librandi family owns 890 acres; 573 are vineyards, 247 are olive groves, and the remaining acres are dedicated to the forest. They focus on indigenous varieties like Gaglioppo, Magliocco and Mantonico, as well as some ancient and experimental grapes. They do have some plantings of international varieties as well.

Duca San Felice is an 85 acre vineyard of Gaglioppo planted on calcareous and clay-loam soil. It’s the oldest vineyard owned by the Librandi family and is the last vineyard planted by Raffaele Librandi, father of Antonio and Nicodemo. Gaglioppo is the predominant variety in Calabria, and DNA testing has shown it to be a sibling of Nerello Mascalese. It thrives in dry conditions, and can be quite tannic and beautifully perfumed, often with aromas of roses. The grapes for this wine were harvested in October, then fermented and aged for 30 months in stainless steel. It’s aged for another 6 months in bottle before release. This is a full-bodied, age-worthy wine, with well-structured and defined tannins. It’s quite aromatic, with hints of sour cherry, tobacco and figs. Red berries, earthiness, and a long, spicy finish bring it all home. Pair this with cured meats and hard cheeses, earthy mushroom-based dishes, slow-cooked beef, roasted meat…think hearty.

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5pm – 8pm

Sept. 9th, 2016

teutonic-rieslingTeutonic Crow Valley Vineyard Riesling 2015, Willamette Valley, OR

Last week we tasted Teutonic Jazz Odyssey, a fun, off-dry blend perfect for hot days and spicy food. Tonight we’re tasting this more serious single vineyard Riesling. Just about all of Teutonic’s wines are single vineyard (with the exception of maybe one). They are all dry farmed and made in a precise, Germanic style. Total production is extremely low (only 500 cases) so we are ever so grateful to have such an assortment on our shelves – this is another producer that we tried to get into RI for a few years, so it’s extra special that there’s finally a little bit to share.

Read more about them here.

Crow Valley is a high elevation vineyard in the foothills of the Willamette Valley coastal mountain range. It’s old vines planted at high elevation, where the cold growing conditions allow for a long hang time. This is the Teutonic MO; old vines, cold climate, high elevation, dry farmed, old wood and wild yeast. If that sounds familiar, it’s because it’s very similar to Mosel winemaking, from whence they draw their inspiration (and they also import wine from Mosel and make wine in Mosel, so the love affair is deep and real!). Teutonic is also a member of the DRC (Deep Roots Coalition), a group that promotes “sustainable and terroir-driven viticulture without irrigation”.

This Riesling shows pure, precise, no-holds-barred, spot on balanced winemaking. The character of the terroir shines through in all the Teutonic wines; do yourself a favor and grab a bottle before they’re all gone!

Cerro La Barca Vegas Altas Eva de los Santos, 2015, Ribera del Guadiana, Spain

Ribera del Guadiana is in Extremadura, a region located in south-western Spain on the border of Portugal. Extramadura has been known as a place for bulk wine production, but some pioneers are finding unique new wines here. Cerro La Barca is the first organic producer in the region. They have 38 hectares of Tempranillo and the nearly extinct Eva de los Santos.

Importer notes: Juan Sojo and Ángel Luis González are like brothers from different mothers. One minute they’re arguing and the next they’re toasting to another harvest. They studied oenology together and ever since have been making wines together. Ángel Luis comes from a background in agriculture while Juan comes from a background in science. Both so different, but yet complement each other so well.

Fermented using indigenous yeasts in stainless steel vats where the wines naturally decant without filtration until bottling. The Eva de los Santos is from vines that are up to 80 years old. It’s flowery, fruity and perfumed on the nose, but the palate is a little more intense, with a pronounced crushed stone quality.

cintreLaurent Herlin “Cintré” Sparkling Rosé of Cabernet Franc

Laurent Herlin worked as a computer engineer for 12 years before dropping that career in 2008 and dedicating himself to wine. After taking classes in Beaune and working at various domaines, he purchased 5 hectares in Bourgueil, which he farms biodynamically.

To ensure quality, the grapes are sorted twice; first in the vineyard, and then on the sorting table. Harvest is manual, fermentations are with indigenous yeast, in steel or cask. As a dedicated environmentalist, Laurent only uses recycled glass in his production.

Laurent’s wines are said to “exude happiness” and after tasting Tsoin Tsoin, and now Cintré, we can definitively say that that statement is not hyperbole. Cintré is 100% Cabernet Franc from 25 year old vines and it is a mouthful of fizzy joy. It’s also classic Loire Valley cab franc: violets, raspberries, and pencil shavings dance around luscious strawberry notes and are neatly wrapped up in a long, long finish with just the slightest touch of gamey goodness.

Domaine Jérôme Jouret “Pas a Pas” 2015, Ardèche

Domaine Jérôme Jouret is a 12 hectare, relatively new, family winery in the southern Ardèche, a region on the right bank of the Rhône river, between the northern and southern Rhône valley. Burgundian Louis Latour was a pioneer here, most notably with his Grande Ardéche Chardonnay. Jérome Jouret works minimally, by hand, with extremely low yields and little to nu sulfur. The ancient, organic vines here are planted on steep and stony slopes. The high elevation and cool climate means that the grapes have a longer hang time, which leads to heady aromatics and purity of fruit.

Pas a Pas is a blend of 65% Carignan, 15% Alicante, 20% Grenache from 35 to 55 year old vines planted on clay and limestone. It’s fermented in stainless steel and bottled without filtration. This is a lovely wine, with fresh fruit and brambly notes. Lower alcohol and lively acidity means this one takes a chill quite nicely.

Read this week’s newsletter here.