Tag Archives: Organic

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5pm – 8pm

August 12, 2016

Louis-Antoine Luyt Pipeño Santa Juana 2015

Louis-Antoine Luyt Pipeño Santa Juana

Louis-Antoine Luyt Pipeño Santa Juana

Louis-Antoine Luyt was a student of Marcel Lapierre, of Morgon and natural winemaking fame. He’s a Frenchman in Chile, making natural wines that conjure a mix of cru Beaujolais and the Loire. He makes small lots of biodynamic wines that are complex, intriguing and terroir driven.

Luyt was the winemaker who resurrected Pais, the humble grape of Pipeño, or peasant wine. In 2007 he made Clos Ouvert Uva Huasa, an earthy, fresh and juicy red from vines planted by Spanish conquistadors. People in Chile were dubious about this fascination with Pais, but Luyt was undeterred, so he and Marcel Lapierre set off on a road trip to find ancient, abandoned, dry-farmed plots of the forgotten variety. Luyt and Lapierre then produced a Pais together, El País de Quenehueao, made via carbonic maceration that was evocative of Morgon and cemented the love affair with Pipeño. Lapierre passed away in 2010 but Luyt continued on his journey of finding and purchasing old plots of Pais. With Concha y Toro recently getting in on the game, it’s practically gone mainstream.

Pipeño Santa Juana is from 250 year old, dry-farmed vines. It’s history in a bottle.

Here’s a photo of Santa Juana Pais vines from the beautiful Louis/Dressner site: Santa Juana vine

And here’s a video of the 2014 Luyt Pipeño harvest and production. We want to go to there.
We’re opening up a few other summer-slakers this evening, but we’re too hazy-lazy to write the notes. Stop in and see what’s what!
Cheers!

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM

2014 Banyan Gewurtztraminer, Monterey County

Here’s yet another wine from HOBO Wine Company; we’re slowly working our way through!

Notes from the producer: Our off dry 2014 Gewürztraminer is grown at Mission Ranch and Ventana Vineyards in the Arroyo Seco AVA of Monterey . Typical for that area, wind, fog, and cool temperatures predominate year round. The vineyard is carefully farmed to assure the specific ripeness, a balance of sugar and acidity, that we are looking for. A long growing season and temperatures that rarely rise above 80˚F create an ideal spot for such an intensely aromatic wine. Once at the winery, grapes are pressed then cold settled for 72 hours before the fermentation is allowed to begin. Fermentation lasted 42 days at 48˚F.

A refreshing bright wine with floral aromatics.

2013 Domaine Thevenet & Fils Macon Pierreclos Blanc

Notes from the importer: This is the workhorse wine of the domaine both for the Thevenet family and for us. The grapes for this cuvée are sourced from four separate parcels within Pierreclos: “Margots”, “Le Chateau”, “Les Grands Buys” and “La Bucherate”. The average age of the vines is forty-five (45) years. The vineyards face east, southeast and south and are situated about 350 feet above sea level on the gently sloping hills of Pierreclos. The wine is aged in cuve in contact with the fine lees but without any exposure to oak. Total annual production is in the neighborhood of 15,000 bottles with a hefty majority dedicated to the US market.

Have as an aperitif, or with oysters, goat cheese, quiches, savory tarts and egg dishes.

Domaine de la Patience Rosé

Domaine de la Patience Rosé

Domaine de la Patience “Nemausa” Costieres des Nimes Rose, 2014

This estate is named for the wild, aromatic herb that grows throughout the vineyard. It’s been in the same family for over 50 years, the 60 hectares of vines are farmed organically, and minimal sulfur is used in the production of the wines.

This rosé is 80% Grenache (40+ year old vines) and 20% Syrah. It’s floral and fruity, with ripe red berries and lively, citrusy acidity. It will be perfect for the beach and backyard weather coming up in the next week, or until the pink well runs dry – so drink ’em while you got ’em!

2013 Domaine des Terres Dorées “L’Ancien” Beaujolais

Jean-Paul Brun’s domaine is located in Charnay, a village in the Southern Beaujolais in an area known as the “Region of Golden Stones”. Brun is the owner and winemaker at this 40-acre family estate and is well known for his Beaujolais, which he makes with minimal intervention, minimal sulfur, and without the use of industrial yeasts, leading to wines that are elegant & delicate, with purity of fruit, and great character and depth. L’Ancien is old-vine Gamay that is earthy & spicy, full of wild red & black fruits.

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM

2013 Gysler Silvaner Halbtrocken, Rheinhessen, Germany

12 hectares, 8,000 cases annually, certified biodynamic

gysler sylvanerNotes from the importer: Gysler’s history in Weinheim dates to 1450, with record of winemaking dating to 1750. The windy, cool microclimate of Weinheim, and its red soil dominated by Rotliegend sandstone, allow Gysler to ply a quite unique expression of Riesling from his 12 hectares, in a region planted to many lesser varieties and hybrids.

When Alexander Gysler took the helm from his father abrubtly, changes were made in the vineyard, including the reversal of the plantings of experimental crossings, instead focusing the estate by increased plantings of classic varieties such as Riesling and Sylvaner. Next came Biodynamic conversion and certification by Demeter in 2008, with the intention of helping to reverse the reputation of Rheinhessen wines as high-yielding, overly sweet ‘plonk.’ Fruit is hand harvested, which is rare in the Rheinhessen, and composting and cover cropping have become integral to the health of the estate’s vines – every second row is planted with flowers & herbs. In 2005, Gysler began bottling his wines in only 2 quality levels, estate and S-class, eschewing the pradikät system that portends quality is based predominantly on ripeness. Other changes include employing whole cluster pressing, spontaneous fermentations in stainless steel, eliminating fining and racking, gross lees contact right up until bottling, and abandoning the use of süssreserve. “2008 was the first vintage we did absolutely no handling of the juice,” says Alex Gysler.

And Terry Theise on the wine: Now 100% estate-bottled (Demeter!), and this is a crisp, fine and charming vintage of this perennial value, showing a curious length. Among the best vintages of a wine I’ve known for nearly thirty years(!).

2012 Chateau de Jouclary, Cabardès Rouge

jouclary 12Robert & Pascal Gianesini farm in the Cabardès AOC, on the southernmost outcropping of the Massif Central in south central France. It’s influenced by both the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea; AOC laws mandate that a minimum of 40% of the varieties must be “atlantique”: Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon or Cabernet Franc and 40% “mediterranean”: Syrah or Grenache.

The 2012 Jouclary rouge is a whole lotta wine for not a whole lotta money. This vintage appears to have more Cab Franc than the 2011, and that is especially apparent on the nose; it’s got tobacco leaf and hints of underbrush mingling with vibrant fruit, earthy complexity, delicate acidity, and a long, lingering finish to boot. It’s a winner!

2013 Domaine Philémon, Gaillac Rouge, Jurançon Noir

Notes from the importer:

philemon juranconDomaine Philémon is a 20 hectare estate located in Villeneuve-sur-Vere, a small village on the Vere river in between Albi and Cordes in the northeast quadrant of the Gaillac appellation. The Vieules family have had a vineyard in Villeneuve since 1804. Today the vineyard is run by Mathieu Vieules who grows wheat, sunflowers and grapes in equal proportions. All of his land is farmed organically with the vineyard being certified in 2013. Mathieu Vieules has twenty hectares of vines in production along the Cordes plateau on south facing slopes with a calcerous soil. They are planted almost entirely to the traditional Gaillac grape varieties: Loin de L’oeil, Mauzac and Muscadelle for the whites, and Braucol (Fer Servadou), Duras and Jurancon Noir for the reds. A good proportion of the vines are more than fifty years old. The vines are trained in the gobelet fashion meaning that they are head pruned and yields are kept exceedingly low; 40 hl/h for the whites and 30hl/h for the reds. The harvest is done entirely by hand.

After a few years of tasting Jurançon Noir from tank and begging Mathieu Vieules to bottle it separately, he finally agreed in 2013. The grapes are hand harvested and put into the cement fermentation tank in whole clusters for a semi-carbonic fermentation with indigenous yeasts. The Jurançon Noir is an old variety local to the southwest of France. According to Jancis Robinson, it is a cross between Folle Blanche and Cot (Malbec). To produce quality wine this vigourous variety must be severely pruned and then it will produce dark, spicy and slightly bitter wine that is 11% alc, when fully ripe. The bottles are sealed with a crown cap.