Tag Archives: prosecco

Friday Wine Tasting, 5PM-8PM: Perlage & Clos du Gravillas

May 5th, 2017

We’ll have Elena Brugnera of Perlage Organic Winery in the shop. Perlage is one of the first Italian organic sparkling wineries; the Nardi family produces Prosecco Valdobbiadene here using both tradition and innovation. We’ll have just the Prosecco Sgajo for sale, but we’ll taste a couple others that will be available for pre-order. Joining Elena will be Justin DeWalt of Chartrand Imports, representing our friends John & Nicole Bojanowski, and their beautiful wines from Minervois.

The Perlage winery is located in the town of Farra di Soligo in the heart of the Conegliano Valdobbiadene area, home to the famous Prosecco region, in northeastern Italy. The vineyard property has been in the Nardi family for more than a century, when Giordano Nardi established an “Azienda Agricola” of vineyards, arable land and cattle breeding. It was in 1981, however, when the 7 Nardi brothers, encouraged and assisted by their parents, Tiziano and Afra, began converting the property to organic agriculture, and then in 2005 began implementing biodynamic practices.  Ivo Nardi, the president and CEO, is a graduate in Agricultural Science from the University of Florence, and Claudio Nardi vineyard manager, received his diploma is technical design with specialized course work.  Perlage’s organic cultivation is controlled and certified by CODEX S.R.L. In addition to growing their own 20 hectare vineyards (abut 50 acres) the winery also purchases grapes from other certified organic vineyards. Chartrand currently imports 7 Perlage wines and will soon begin importing the first No Sulfite Added prosecco, Animae!

In addition to the Sgajo Prosecco Spumante DOC Treviso (vegan), we’ll have a couple other Perlage wines available to taste and for pre-order, with a special tasting discount.

Justin DeWalt will also be in the shop representing Clos du Gravillas. Here’s Chartrand’s notes on the winery:

In 1996 John and Nicole Bojanowski, a young Franco-American couple, purchased Clos de Gravillas in the Minervois region of southwestern France and embarked upon a journey of making wine to best reflect the terroir of limestone gravel of their vineyards where grapes have been grown for hundreds of years.

Perched on a plateau at an elevation of almost 1000′, this 15-acre winery lies between the St. Chinian and Minerve canyons in the Parc Naturel of the Haut Languedoc  just south of the Black Mountains. This location provides cool evening winds that let the grapes better retain their acidity and the hot summer temperatures assure the development of the necessary alcohol to balance acidity. This element of their terroir helps the grapes develop maximum depth of flavor.

The estate’s oldest vines are carignan, dating to 1911 and 1970 and a small parcel of grenache gris. In 1996 they planted syrah, cabernet, and mourvedre, with the first harvest taking place in 2006.

We’ll taste “a Fleur de Peau“, a skin contact Muscat (the name refers to a French expression indicating someone who wears their expressions on their sleeve) of which only 83 cases were made, and “Rendez-vous Sur la Lune” Rouge, a blend of equal parts Carignan and Syrah, with a balance of 10% Grenache. 583 cases produced.

Fümp!Fest at Bucktown! Friday, May 5th!

bucktown fump festRain will force fizzy festivities indoors, but that won’t dampen the fun! Come get fried chicken by the piece or bucket, and fizzy by the glass or bottle!

Wine Wizards and SelectioNaturel will be in attendance, and rumor has it that Fümp t-shirts exist for a lucky few! Show up at Bucktown after 5pm, and pretend you’re on a sunny Italian hillside. Why not?

 

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop with Jenny & François

Nov. 13th, 5pm – 8pm

Jenny & François Tasting in the Shop

Jenny & François with Tim Mortimer – All of these will be SO GOOD
on your holiday table! 

Ca dei Zago Prosecco Col Fondo 2014, Veneto

 

We continue to flip over this gentle little fizzy. It’s light, refreshing and good anytime of day, and with any meal – or with no meal at all. It’s a blend of Glera from very old clones, Verdiso, Perera, and Bianchetta from massale selection. Col Fondo means ‘on the sediment’ so you can store it upright and enjoy the sediment separately (as they do in Valdobbiadene) or swirl it as you drink so that it’s incorporated throughout. Either way is the right way. The 2014 is so fresh and delicious, we just want to drink it all the time. It’s like a mouth full of crisp apples and pears; it’s super clean, softly sparkling, and all around satisfying. This is just what you need to welcome your holiday guests: it’s fun, interesting, and at just 10% abv, it’s perfect for easing into the party–or for brunch the next day. Practicing biodynamic since 2010. Want to know more? Check out this video of Christian Zago!

Chemins de Bassac Isa White 2014, Languedoc-Roussillon

Isabelle and Rémy Ducellier own and operate this small, organically certified estate located in Vin de Pays Côtes de Thongue, which is a collection of 14 villages in Languedoc. Like Isabelle and Rémy, the wines of Chemins de Bassac are friendly and easy-going, generous and inviting. Together they make and market their wines, with Rémy even designing the labels.

Isa White is a blend of Roussanne and Viognier that is gorgeously aromatic, lushly textured, and popping with flowers, ripe peaches and apricots. It’s beautifully balanced with stony minerality and a touch of orange pith on the long finish.

Domaine Jérôme Jouret La Coulée Douce 2014, Rhone Valley

Domaine Jérôme Jouret is a 12 hectare, relatively new, family winery in the southern Ardèche, a region on the right bank of the Rhône river, between the northern and southern Rhône valley. Burgundian Louis Latour was a pioneer here, most notably with his Grande Ardéche Chardonnay. We’re most familiar with the cult wines of Hervé Souhaut, which we try to have on our shelves whenever we can. Jérome Jouret works much like Souhaut; that is, minimally, by hand, with extremely low yields and little to no sulfur. The ancient, organic vines here are planted on steep and stony slopes. The high elevation and cool climate means that the grapes have a longer hang time, which leads to heady aromatics and purity of fruit. This unsulfured Syrah comes on with clean, vibrant fruit that gives way to smoky, minerally notes, then takes another turn to flowers and fresh tobacco. The texture is refined, as is the experience of drinking this wine.

Domaine du Mortier Graviers 2013, Loire Valley

Domaine du Mortier is a 9 hectare, certified biodynamic property located in Saint Nicolas de Bourgeuil. Brothers Fabien and Cyril Boisard were quite young when they started Domaine du Mortier nearly ten years ago. And while they don’t hail from a long line of winemakers, they do employ the most traditional method of propagating vines: Selection Massale, a labor intensive and time consuming practice of selecting the best vines in a vineyard and propagating through cuttings. With this level of discipline and commitment, it’s no surprise that they always produce top notch wines, from glou-glou to lay-it-down. All wines here are bottled unfiltered and unfined.

Mortier Gravier is 100% Cabernet Franc grown on gravel. Grapes are hand-harvested, fermented with wild yeast in barrel, then aged for 8 months in oak. This is a raspberry and cassis scented wine, with the mineral (gravelly) notes intertwined with juicy fruit, subtle spices and a satisfying roundness on the palate.  

Click here for today’s entire newsletter, including Thanksgiving picks and new arrivals.

 

Friday Wine Tasting, 5PM-8PM

Le Colture Prosecco D.O.C di Trevizo “Sylvoz”

This Prosecco is from third generation winemaker Alberto Ruggeri and sourced entirely from his family’s estate vineyards in Valdobbiadene. These vineyards have been in the Ruggeri family since the late 1800’s. To ensure freshness, the estate keeps the Prosecco in tank and bottles to order. This is a soft little sparkler, full of elegant fruit, ripe apples and vibrant acidity.

Domaine de la Patience Chardonnay 2011

This certified organic family estate located in the Costières de Nîmes takes its name from a wild, aromatic herb “La Patience” that can be found throughout the vineyard. After a decade of managing the winemaking at the local cooperative Christophe Aguilar decided it was time to make his own wine. Today Christophe farms 60 hectares of vines, fifty-years ago his grandfather farmed the same soil, with a deep respect & understanding of the terroir.

This is a fruity but dry white, filled with tart & zesty acidity, with lemons and peaches on the nose and palate. It’s a great seafood and chicken pair, or with simple veggie dishes, salads and mild, soft cheeses.

Domaine du Crêt de Bine Beaujolais 2011

François and Marie-Therèse Subrin biodynamically farm 5 hectares of land in the village of Sarcy, in the southwest corner of Beaujolais. The vines average 40 years old and are planted on granite soils rich in quartz. To ensure maximum ripeness, yields are extremely limited & harvest is as late as possible, sometimes stretching into October. No sulfur is used in the production of this wine.

This wine is delicate, with notes of spearmint & chamomile tea mingling with bright red berries and stony minerality. It’s an easy one to toss back.

Primaterra Sangiovese, Sicily

This is an exceptional little everyday value wine from Sicily. The grapes are grown 300 meters above sea level, and the wine is fermented and aged in 30% oak, 70% stainless steel. The Primaterra wines are made to be fruity expressions of their terroir, and that’s exactly what this wine is all about: cherries, subtle spices, fresh acidity, barely there tannins and a pleasant finish. What’s not to like?

Saturday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 3pm-5pm. Thanksgiving Picks!

Adami Sul Lievito Valdobbiadene Prosecco DOCG

Now on its 3rd generation of winemakers, Adami is known for Prosecco’s 1st Cru vineyard: Giardino. This year the winery was awarded a Slow Wine award, for its dedication to the practice of making Prosecco in the traditional method. The Sul Lievito is from slightly riper grapes that undergo a second fermentation in the bottle. It is another Prosecco that is left “on the sediment” or spent lees. The sediment acts as a preservative so no sulphites are added to Sul Lievito; the total amount of S02 is less than half of that allowed for organic wines in Italy. Finally, all of the sugar is fermented, so there is zero residual sugar. This is healthy Prosecco!

As Prosecco should be, Sul Lievito is refreshing! But it’s also complex with notes of bread crust and flowers. It’s dry, minerally and light – perfect as a starter or to sip throughout the meal.

Elena Walch Gewurtztraminer 2011, Alto Adige, Italy

Elena Walch trained as an architect before marrying into one of Alto Adiges most highly regarded family-run estates. It quickly became obvious that she had a knack for wine-making and she soon took over numerous duties, from vineyard to cellar. An ardent devotee of environmental causes, she has transformed the 33 hectare estate into one that now operates fully sustainably, in the true sense of the word. Read her sustainability manifesto here.

Elena Walch Gewurtztraminer hails from Tramin, where the grape itself originated. This wine is bursting with heady aromatics: flowers, rose petals, tropical fruit and spices float up and out of the glass. The palate is concentrated, rich and delicious. There’s a reason why people reach for Gewurz on Thanksgiving: what better beverage to do battle with a multitude of dishes, from savory to sweet, than a wine that has the same range? Grab this bottle, be happy.

Bedrock Shebang! Red, 6th Cuvée, Old Vine Cuvée

This is an everyday California blend from Morgan Twain-Peterson of Bedrock fame. Morgan grew up in the wine business, as he’s the son of Joel Peterson, owner and winemaker at Ravenswood. Shebang is Morgan’s entry level, every day red, but it’s anything but ordinary. It’s a blend of multiple vintages, which is why it is cuvee #6 and not vintage dated. Morgan does not reveal the vineyards from which the grapes are sourced, but they’re from some of the most famous and well-known sites in California. The Sixth Cuvée is designated as an Old Vine Cuvée for the first time, as 92% of the fruit was sourced from vines more than 90 years old. This includes some declassified fruit from the 100+ year old Bedrock vineyard in Sonoma Valley. The blend is 60% Zinfandel with a balance of Carignan, Alicante Bouchet, Syrah and a few other old-vine, field blend grapes thrown in for good measure. The wine was fermented on native yeasts, aged in French oak (15% new), and made with the same attention that is given to Bedrock’s wines.

It’s a plush, round & soft red loaded with juicy fruit, but backed up with surprising depth and character. It’s the perfect pair for burgers, pizza and other casual fair, but zinfandel loves Thanksgiving, so Thanksgiving loves Shebang.

Bonny Doon ‘A Proper Claret’ 2012, Bonny Doon Vineyard, California

62% Cabernet Sauvignon, 22% Petit Verdot, 8% Tannat, 7% Syrah, 1% Petite Sirah.

Whenever we’re about to write a note about Bonny Doon wines, we end up just throwing up our hands and saying: why bother? Behold, the winemakers notes:

Some cautionary words: Bonny Doon Vineyard is, as we all know or should know, a strictly cabernet-free zone, at least it has been for the last twenty-eight years. The last “Claret” produced at Bonny Doon Vineyard was in 1985 from grapes grown at our late Estate in the eponymous hamlet of Bonny Doon. It was a blend of approximately equal parts of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cab. Franc, Merlot and Malbec, and against all expectation, it was actually pretty damn good. Randall Grahm, owner and winemaker, has expressed opprobrium, occasionally bordering on amused disdain, for this popular grape variety. We are not really at liberty to say how Bonny Doon Vineyard has come to be entrusted with the distribution of a wine made from such improbably alien grape varieties, but suffice to say that the deal was doon grudgingly and harumphingly.

So, with these caveats, the sentiment at Bonny Doon Vineyard is that if we ever were to drink a cabernet-based blend, this would be one that would serve quite well. It is lean, neither overly alcoholic (weighing in at 13%), nor overly extracted; it is precisely as one would imagine A Proper Claret to be. The wine contains a substantial dollop of petit verdot (22%), which adds a silky note of violets and textural elegance, in precision counterpoint to the lead-in-the-pencil firmness offered by the inclusion of the manly tannat (8%). There is a lovely suggestion of cedar and mint, in the nose. The wine has medium tannins, nice acidity, and finishes cleanly.

Now, as to the label. What can we say? We are just scandalized, sputteringly unable to countenance the opportunistic wine marketeers who would stoop to using lurid imagery merely to sell a bottle of wine. Has it come to this? It is only because we enjoyed the wine so much that we are willing to put up with the tasteless monstrosity that is this label. “Proper”(!?!) Claret. Indeed.

Food Pairings: Proper (British) mutton, proper leg of lamb, (ideally served with proper Yorkshire pudding).

We (Campus) must interject on these otherwise perfect notes to say that turkey would also be a fine match for a Proper Claret. Really, we’re not just saying that.

Cheers!