Tag Archives: Providence wine shop

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop – All SelectioNaturel

June 9, 2017

We’re excited about tonight’s line-up of SelectioNaturel wines, and grateful to importer Matt Mollo, and Wine Wizards rep Kat Cummings for providing us with such colorful notes for this newsletter; they make us feel like we’re there!

Fondo Bozzole Foxi Trebbiano Romagnolo 2015

Matt’s notes: Brothers Franco and Mario Accorsi are farmers at heart, more specifically they primarily cultivate orchards filled with local varieties of pears and apples. The farm was run by their grandfather Ezio who raised cows and produced cheese sold in the local markets around south eastern Lombardy. Today Franco and Mario have integrated orchard fruit production with several small parcels of old vineyards and focus on producing wines from near-lost indigenous varieties of lambrusco. All the vineyard work is done organically (certified), yields are limited and natural fermentations and low sulfur additions are key to their production. The OltrePo` Mantovano is, as the name suggests, on the banks of the Po` River Valley to the south of the village of Mantova. Soils are clay and limestone mixed with alluvial deposits left by the river. This unique and tiny DOC is the only appellation outside of Emilia-Romagna that produces true lambrusco.

Kat’s tasting notes: The thing that appeals most to me about Foxi is that it’s an entirely new experience every time I drink it. I always forget just how much I love it. It’s fresh and lively and immediate but also a little round and ever-so-slightly caramel. And dangerously easy to drink. Better to have two bottles. Also don’t you want to sing that Fergie song about it and say “foxi” instead of “flossy”

G-L-A-M-O-R-O-U-S

Rabasco Vino Rosato Cancelli 2016

Kat’s notes: Iole Rabasco is magic. She grows mostly old-vine Montepulciano (with some old-vine Trebbiano and olives and magic fagioli perle thrown in for good measure) on her 10 hectare estate in the hills of Pianella. Another wonderfully magical thing to know: there are crazy old (think 130 year old) olive trees right outside her front door. I know because I saw them when her family generously welcomed a group of loopy, wine-weary travelers into their home this spring. For dinner we were offered not only the aforementioned perle beans alongside thousands of pastas and meats, BUT ALSO bread baked by Iole’s mom, Giulia, using yeast from the second racking of Salita Rosso, Iole’s red cuvée from the ultra steep La Salita vineyard. But I digress.

Pianella is situated in the north-central corner of Abruzzo, an area blessed with a unique set of micro-climates — the Adriatic is some 40 kilometers away, offering tempering maritime influences, while the base of Gran Sasso flanks the western edge of the Rabasco property. I’m assured that some short months before our March visit there was snow piled everywhere.

No chemicals ever touch Iole’s vines or the wines in her cellar. The Rosato Cancelli is direct press Montepulciano from the Cancelli vineyard site, a bowl that starts at the base of the La Salita slalom run and jumps a small road to climb the more gentle adjacent slope. This wine is part of a serious Abruzzo tradition — no skin maceration as is the custom, a fact belied by its electric raspberry hue. In 2016, Iole opted to ferment the rosato in cement and then age in stainless steel (rather than her classic fiberglass damigiana used in years past), producing a super fresh and vibrant wine laced with tension and electricity. This isn an all year round, family sort of wine, meant for pairing with whatever brings your family to the table. It is pure joy, refined and elegant but still ready to dance barefoot at the end of the night. To recap, it is magic. – Kat Cummings

Ceppaiolo:

Matt’s notes: This tiny property acts as the purest, most rudimentary “laboratory” for Danilo Marcucci’s natural wine designs. Here no compromise is taken. Given the exceedingly small scale of the property, 4 rows of vines that total less than 1 hectare, Danilo and his friend Riccardo can do things on a different wavelength…no time frames, no yielding. The beauty of Ceppaiolo is that it displays the classic “contrasto Italiano” with clarity…plain and simple, Ceppaiolo is a dump. Nothing more then a run down cement farm house that lies mostly in disrepair with bombed out old Fiats and farm equipment scattered around the property. There’s no electricity, no bathroom. Just a 4 rows of some of the oldest, rarest and most ‘antique’ varieties of Umbrian vines, all white, that can be found in the region; trubiano (trebbiano dorato), malvasia bianca, grechetto, fumaiola (a rare variety of verdicchio), uva pecora, san colombana. Winemaking is beyond rudimentary…no pumping, nothing more then 1 old barrel, a couple resin tanks, a cement vat and some demijohns. Here the ‘terroir’ is not the soil or the altitude but the old vine material and the vision of Danilo and Riccardo, basta.

Ceppaiolo Bianco 2105: All the white varieties, harvested fully mature. De-stemmed, skin contact for 2 days. Aged in resin and bottle.

Ceppaiolo Rosso 2014: Sangiovese, Vernaccia rossa, canaiolo. 10 days skin maceration, aged in old barrel and bottle. No sulfur.

Here’s the whole newsletter.

Tastings in the Shop for Memorial Day/Brown Grad Weekend 2017!

This is always one of the busiest weekends of the year for us, and it’s also one of the most fun. This Friday will be extra-special (and extra fun!) since we’ll have the guys from Farmer Willie’s with us, followed by a French wine tasting with Leigh of Wine Traditions. Our Saturday beer tasting will feature a visit from CT’s Thimble Island Brewing Co. Swing on by, grab some sips. And happy graduation, happy long weekend!

FRIDAY 3-5PM: FARMER WILLIE’S Alcoholic Ginger Beer 

FRIDAY 5-8PM WINE TRADITIONS with Leigh Ranucci

SATURDAY 3-6PM: THIMBLE ISLAND BREWING

Farmer Willie's

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wine Traditions

Friday Wine Tasting in the shop, 5-8PM

May 19, 2017

Domaine Philemon Perlé Gaillac Blanc 

perle

Perlé Gaillac Blanc is all fresh deliciousness. It’s 60% Loin de L’oeil, 20% Muscadelle and 20% Sauvignon Blanc. The property in southwest France has been in the Vieules family for over 200 years; today Mathieu Vieules grows wheat, sunflowers and grapes in equal proportion.

This wine is the perfect aperitif or accompaniment to warm-weather food: it’s lively, citrusy, ever-so-slightly spritzy, and balanced out by a bit of garden herbs and green apple. And it’s well under 15 bucks.

 

AJ Adam Riesling Trocken 2015, Mosel 

Here’s a good telling of the Andreas Adam story. And here are more notes from the importer (clearly we’re too hot for writing): This Estate Trocken (Gutsriesling) is entirely from Dhron. Like a good Bourgogne Blanc it’s sourced from several top vineyards to make a wine that speaks to the vintage, region and style of the producer. The fruit harvested was very clean and at about 79 oechsle, similar to his Hofberg Kabinett. Fermented with spontaneous yeast in stainless steel and a bit of old fuder, the fermentation stopped at 7 grams of RS, “where it finds it’s balance”.

Champagne Moutard Brut Grand Cuvée NV

The Moutard family has been farming in Buxeuil, in the Côte des Bar since 1642, and has been making wine since 1927. In addition to Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier, they also grow heirloom varieties Petit Meslier and Arbanne on their 20 hectares of vines. Grand Cuvée is 100% Pinot Noir, and like all the champagne produced at Moutard, it spends a minimum of 3 years on the lees. It’s a rich, ripe, and approachable style, with nuts and brioche on the nose, and a creamy texture. At under $40, it’s very affordable farmer fizz.

Étienne Courtois L’Icaunais 2013, Loire

Notes from the importer:  Claude Courtois has created a small farm which exemplifies what biodynamic is in terms of biodiversity and self-sufficiency, although he does not consider himself to be a biodynamic grower. He farms a balanced & completely chemical free 13-hectares of vines in the heart of the VDP Sologne. Courtois also grows organic wheat, which he feeds to his cows. “Nothing comes into my vineyard,” he says, meaning no chemicals ever. He has created a well-balanced, bio-diversity with trees, fruit trees, vines, woods, and fields. No pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, chemical fertilizers, or synthetic chemicals of any kind are allowed on the vines or in the soil of the vineyards. He has his own methods for promoting the diverse life of the soil. The grapes—Gamay, Cabernet Franc, Côt (Malbec), Cabernet Sauvignon, Sauvignon Blanc & Pineau d’ Aunis—are harvested by hand and only indigenous yeasts are used during fermentation. Claude regards the soil on his farm as a living organism. He lives in harmony with nature and the wines he crafts are a pure and vibrant testament to outstanding Biodynamic winemaking.

Claude, who is growing older, has started to pass off the winemaking to his son Etienne, who is already showing immense promise…read more.

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM: Vineyard Road

May 12, 2017

Tonight Peter Buckley of Vineyard Road is in the shop with two French producers. We’ll taste a couple wines from Gilles Bonnefoy in Cotes de Forez, and another two from Domaine Leliévre in Lorraine.

Vineyard Road Selection

Gilles Bonnefoy’s Les Vin de la Madone is situated so far on the Loire River that it’s actually closer to Beaujolais. Côtes du Forez is located on a geological fault formed in the Tertiary Period when Africa pushed into Europe and formed the Alps. There are up to 105 volcanoes in the greater area of AOC Volcanique Du Massif Central; thirty of them are in Côtes du Forez, and Gilles’ vineyards (in both Cotes du Forez and Urfé) are situated around two of them. So volcanic soil plays a big role here. Gilles has been tending vines here since 1997. He biodynamically farms 8 hectares in the village of Champdieu. Seventy-five percent of his vines are planted on volcanic soils of Urfé, the rest are on clay and granite.

Domaine Lelièvre is located in Cotes de Toul, Lorraine. The Lelièvre family goes back generations here, to the time when Romans first planted vines. At one time Cotes de Toul, situated just 60 miles south of the German border, was a thriving wine-production region, covering parts of Alsace and Lorraine. It was famous for Riesling (this makes sense, as it’s located on the western banks of Moselle River–follow it north and you’re in Mosel, Germany) and as a source of base wine for Champagne. Unfortunately the region was ravaged by phylloxera, war, rabid industrialization and poor vineyard management. During the First World War the German occupation, and subsequent liberation by the Allies, left most of the vineyards as battle trenches. The final blow came in 1919, when a law was passed restricting the name champagne to the wines made from grapes grown in the region of Champagne. By 1951 there were only 30 hectares of vineyards left and most of the wine was bottled by negotiants. In 1998, a handful of remaining vignerons fought for and won AOC status. The Lelièvres were one of the producers to champion the region. After the famous 1971 vintage, Jean Lelièvre decided to no longer sell to negotiants and to bottle everything at the estate. From there the family started to rebuild, replant and recapture the glory of Lorraine. It is still an obscure little region, with most of the wine staying within the area, and very little of it leaving France. Lelièvre makes about 1100 cases annually, and they’re one of the most well known producers in the area.

The wines, not necessarily in order:

Madone Sauvignon Gris et Blanc de Madone, VdP Urfé, 2014
60% Sauvignon Blanc and 40% Sauvignon Gris, this is an elegant, clean, mineral-driven beauty. Delicate, rocky, with echoes of Sancerre and Aligoté. Think seafood and summer, should we ever see the sun.

Gamay de Bouze and Gamay Noir de Madone, Gamays sur Volcan VdP Urfé, 2014
A blend of two varieties of teinturier (red-fleshed) Gamay, this is a vibrant wine full of cherries, bright acidity, barely-there tannins, and a touch of dried herbs. Sauçissons, roast chicken, fresh and grilled veggies…

Domaine Lelièvre Gris de Toul Rosé, 2015
A blend of 90% Gamay and 10% Pinot Noir from the producers best plots located in Lucey, Bruley, Blénod les Toul and Buligny. The well-drained clayey slopes are protected from the wet winds coming from the West. Grapes were hand-harvested and vinified separately in stainless steel, matured briefly on the lees, and then assembled just before bottling. This wine is salty, tart, tangy, bright; pink grapefruit up front and a dash of cherry on the finish. Delicious. It might be a little too delicate to handle spicy food, but it’s game for just about anything else. Just fill a glass!

Domaine Lelievre, Sparkling Gamay Rosé Leucquois
Come on, it’s fizzy Gamay with a bunny on the label. Fun, crushable, puts a little hop in your step in the midst of grey days. Glug-glug!

Click here for more info on events and new arrivals.

Friday Wine Tasting, 5PM-8PM: Perlage & Clos du Gravillas

May 5th, 2017

We’ll have Elena Brugnera of Perlage Organic Winery in the shop. Perlage is one of the first Italian organic sparkling wineries; the Nardi family produces Prosecco Valdobbiadene here using both tradition and innovation. We’ll have just the Prosecco Sgajo for sale, but we’ll taste a couple others that will be available for pre-order. Joining Elena will be Justin DeWalt of Chartrand Imports, representing our friends John & Nicole Bojanowski, and their beautiful wines from Minervois.

The Perlage winery is located in the town of Farra di Soligo in the heart of the Conegliano Valdobbiadene area, home to the famous Prosecco region, in northeastern Italy. The vineyard property has been in the Nardi family for more than a century, when Giordano Nardi established an “Azienda Agricola” of vineyards, arable land and cattle breeding. It was in 1981, however, when the 7 Nardi brothers, encouraged and assisted by their parents, Tiziano and Afra, began converting the property to organic agriculture, and then in 2005 began implementing biodynamic practices.  Ivo Nardi, the president and CEO, is a graduate in Agricultural Science from the University of Florence, and Claudio Nardi vineyard manager, received his diploma is technical design with specialized course work.  Perlage’s organic cultivation is controlled and certified by CODEX S.R.L. In addition to growing their own 20 hectare vineyards (abut 50 acres) the winery also purchases grapes from other certified organic vineyards. Chartrand currently imports 7 Perlage wines and will soon begin importing the first No Sulfite Added prosecco, Animae!

In addition to the Sgajo Prosecco Spumante DOC Treviso (vegan), we’ll have a couple other Perlage wines available to taste and for pre-order, with a special tasting discount.

Justin DeWalt will also be in the shop representing Clos du Gravillas. Here’s Chartrand’s notes on the winery:

In 1996 John and Nicole Bojanowski, a young Franco-American couple, purchased Clos de Gravillas in the Minervois region of southwestern France and embarked upon a journey of making wine to best reflect the terroir of limestone gravel of their vineyards where grapes have been grown for hundreds of years.

Perched on a plateau at an elevation of almost 1000′, this 15-acre winery lies between the St. Chinian and Minerve canyons in the Parc Naturel of the Haut Languedoc  just south of the Black Mountains. This location provides cool evening winds that let the grapes better retain their acidity and the hot summer temperatures assure the development of the necessary alcohol to balance acidity. This element of their terroir helps the grapes develop maximum depth of flavor.

The estate’s oldest vines are carignan, dating to 1911 and 1970 and a small parcel of grenache gris. In 1996 they planted syrah, cabernet, and mourvedre, with the first harvest taking place in 2006.

We’ll taste “a Fleur de Peau“, a skin contact Muscat (the name refers to a French expression indicating someone who wears their expressions on their sleeve) of which only 83 cases were made, and “Rendez-vous Sur la Lune” Rouge, a blend of equal parts Carignan and Syrah, with a balance of 10% Grenache. 583 cases produced.

Friday Tasting in the Shop, 5PM – 8PM

April 14, 2017

Partially TBD:

The beautiful weather has got us a little distracted, so we’re still deciding on which wines to taste tonight. Except we do know that we’re opening up Château la Colombière “Le Grand B” Bouysselet. Philippe and Diane Cauvin work this family-owned property in Fronton organically (certified), and ferment with wild yeast, and little to no sulfur. We love their Negrette (maybe we’ll open that too) which is soft and approachable, with lots of dark fruit and depth. Bouysselet is pretty much on no ones radar. Philippe and Diane were researching the history of winegrowing in their appellation when they stumbled across this grape they didn’t even know existed. They found two 200-year old vines on their property, and through Selection Massale and grafting, have slowly turned those two vines into one acre. So this wine is from the only acre of these vines known to exist in the world. That’s pretty special. The wine itself is lush and tropical, with beautiful acidity, and a finish that hangs around and makes your mouth water for more food and wine. It’s a great pair for seafood and shellfish. Definitely stop in to try some if you can.

In addition the Colombiere, we got some other new wines from MFW, and Dressner is arriving today, more rosés are rolling in…so we have many delicious choices for tonight’s tasting. But we’re keeping you in suspense!

Cheers and see you soon!

Friday Tasting in the Shop, 5PM-9PM

March 24, 2017

Weingut Keller Gruner Silvaner Trocken 2015, Rheinhessen, Germany

Klaus Peter and Julia Keller’s dry Rieslings are considered by many to be amongst the greatest expressions of the grape; Jancis Robinson calls them the “Montrachets of Germany”. But they don’t make just high end, hard to find wines; they also make entry-level wines that are just as meticulously made, but won’t break the bank – like this one. The organically farmed vineyards on the slopes of the Rhine River have been in the Keller family since 1789. The soil on these rolling hills is limestone rich, adding mineral intensity, vibrant aromatics, and gem-like purity. Gruner Silvaner is what they call Silvaner here (literally “Green Silvaner”, and not the same grape as Austria’s Gruner Veltliner). Silvaner is the offspring of Savagnin, a grape mostly known for vin jaune in the Jura, and Traminer, aka Savagnin Blanc (a relative of Gewurtztraminer).

This 2015 Silvaner is beautifully balanced and bursting with flowers, peaches, and stony mineral freshness. It will pair perfectly with spring, should it arrive.

Swick Rosé of Pinot Noir Pétillant Naturel 2016, Willamette Valley, Oregon

This is Rhode Island, Joe Swick’s home away from home, so we probably don’t need to tell you the Swick story. But if you want it, here’s the short version.

In any event, we are really happy to snag some of this Pét-Nat rosé. We tasted the barrel sample with Joe back in October, and loved it then for its juicy, grapefruity fabulousness. This is day-drinking fizzy, and it would be a go-to summer bottle, but alas, there will be none left. Only 33 cases were produced, so get it now or don’t get it at all.

It’s from grapes that are hand-harvested, then pressed as whole bunches. Indigenous yeast fermentation is for 3 weeks in 6-year old barrels. The wine was bottled with a small amount of residual sugar, and finished fermenting in the bottle with no filtration and no sulfur added. It was then hand-disgorged, recapped, and sent out into the world.

Domaine La Réméjeanne “Les Chèvrefeuilles” Côtes du Rhône Rouge 2014

François Klein established Domaine La Réméjeanne in 1960 on 5 hectares near the town of Bagnols-sur-Cèze in the Gard. It’s now operated by his son Remi, and grandson Olivier. Remi diversified the property with olive groves and fig trees, and worked over the years to convert the domaine to organic farming; it’s now 38 hectares and has been certified organic since 2010.

Les Chèvrefeuilles is 70% Syrah, 10% Grenache and Mourvedre, 5% old-vine Carignan, and 5% Marselan (a cross of cabernet sauvignon and grenache noir). This wine is soft and fruity up front with blackberries, a touch of plums, and hints of chocolate and mint. Tannins are fine-grained, and the finish is long and pleasant. Pair it with poultry, grilled meat, roasted vegetables; the fresh and fruity character can handle a bit of spice and umami too.

Domaine de la Noblaie “Les Temps des Cerises” Chinon 2014

This property, 24 hectares situated at one of the highest points in Chinon, dates back to the 15th or 16th century. The domaine now houses four generations of the same family; Jérome Billard is the current winemaker. He earned his chops as an intern at Chateau Petrus in Bordeaux, and Dominus in California. He returned to Chinon and the family domaine in 2003; in 2005 the property was certified organic.

Aside from the high slopes upon which it is situated, Noblaie also sits upon soils of limestone, clay and chalk. All harvests are carried out by hand, and by the same crew year after year. The wines here are fermented and aged in stainless steel, some in barrel, and some in chalk vats carved out of the earth. That’s pretty darned cool.

Les Temps des Cerises (Cherry time!) is from vines averaging 30 years old, grown on tuffeau. Wild yeast fermentation, 8 months in tank, no sulfur during production, little to none added at bottling. This is pure Loire Cab Franc, with all the telltale traits you know and love: medium-bodied, with a little bit of raspberry, a touch of lead pencil, a dash of brambly forrest floor, and sure, cherries too.

Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5pm – 8pm

Friday, March 3, 2017

Elvio Tintero Vino Rosato
90% Barbera, 5% Moscato, 5% Favorita

Cantine Elvio Tintero was founded in 1900 by Frenchman Pierre Tintero, when he happened upon the small estate while looking for work in Piedmont. The vineyards were already being worked alone by a young widow named Rosina. The two married, had children, and the estate remains in the same family today. The vines are sustainably farmed and all vinification is in stainless steel.

This is a fun, fruity and lively (gentle) frizzante from young vines planted on clay, limestone and tufa. It’s produced and bottled by vintage, (this one is 2016) but because Tintero sources from different parts of Piedmont, there is no specific DOC, and therefore vintage dating is not allowed. This wine is bottled unfiltered.

Les Vins Pirouettes ‘Tutti Frutti de Stéphane’ Binner & Co. 2014, Alsace

Importer notes: Les Vins Pirouettes is a project launched by Christian Binner, that brings affordable natural wines to the table, and at the same time helps organic and biodynamic grape growers in Alsace move away from selling their grapes to cooperatives towards making and bottling natural wines. Each cuvée is made at a young growers winery. They supply the grapes and Christian supplies his 20 years of expertise in making natural wine in Alsace, and of course his marketing and distribution savvy. Each cuvée will feature the name of the grower on the bottle.

Tutti Frutti is a blend of Pinot Gris, Gewürztraminer, Auxerrois, Pinot Blanc and Muscat grown on limestone silt, from vines about 40 years old. Grapes are hand harvested, de-stemmed, and fermented with indigenous yeast and zero sulfur. The wine stays on its lees for several months before being bottled without sulfur, filtering or fining. Tutti Frutti is all about texture and orchard fruit.

Azienda Agricola Al Di La Del Fiume ‘Fricandò’ Albana, 2015, Emilia-Romagna

We first tasted this wine back in October, and we continue to love it! It just got some bigger love than ours though, with a little shout out in the Feiring Line: “Hate apple cider in your wine? Then pass, but if like me this is a non-issue, you’ll find plenty of enjoyment here. Macerated in anfora for up to three months, there’s a lot of tannin from the thick skins and a lot of complexity. This is a full on lovely wine with a plush crustiness in the texture and blushing apricot.”

“The Farm Beyond the River” is a small, biodynamically farmed, 27 hectare property, 3 of which are planted to Albana and Barbera. Everything here is done by hand & without chemicals or additives.

Fricando is amphora fermented & macerated Albana, a rare, thick-skinned grape indigenous to Bologna. Whole clusters are added to terracotta vessels where it slowly ferments, and then the wine is bottled unfined, unfiltered and unsulfured. As a skin-fermented wine, Fricando pours a deep, brilliant amber. Along with the cidery notes, it’s also umami driven, and pleasantly oxidative. Don’t over chill, a little cool will do.

Poderi Cellario È Rosso, Piedmont

Fausto & Cinzia Cellario are 3rd generation winemakers in the village of Carru` on the western outskirts of the Langhe. They focus on indigenous grapes, farm entirely organically, and only use wild yeasts. Sulfur is avoided, but may be added in tiny quantities at bottling, if at all.

È Rosso is a liter of Barbera grown at high altitude. It’s gluggable and slurpable, full of berries, spice, woodsy earth and subtle tannins – and under crown-cap for easy access!

Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5pm – 8pm

Friday, February 17th

Tonight in the shop we have Gian Lorenzo Ernesto of Picollo Ernesto in Piedmont, and Enrico Pierazzuoli of Tenuta Pierazzuoli/Cantagallo in Montalbano, and also of Tenuta La Farnete in Carmignano, Tuscany. These two winemakers are friends who travel to promote their wines together, and we’re very happy to have them in our shop tonight. Picollo Ernesto is a 3rd generation producer on 8 hectares in Rovereto di Gavi. These high elevation, sunny, southern exposure vineyards are farmed traditionally, without chemicals. The Gavi made here is refreshing, minerally, lightly fruity and sunny like the hillsides.

Enrico Pierazzuoli’s family has owned their 200 hectares of olives, grapes and forest in Montalbano and Carmignano since 1970. The Pierazzuili/Cantagallo property is in Montalbano DOCG, a subzone of Chianti known for a lighter, fruitier, more acid-driven style. The family’s vineyards are located in the southern part of the region, and planted on marl, making the Sangiovese-based wines a bit fuller and softer, but retaining balanced, appetizing acidity.

Tenute la Farnete is in Carmignano, a region in Tuscany that has been considered one of the best for red wine production since the Middle Ages. The vineyards are situated on a series of low-lying hills; as a result, the Sangiovese that makes up the base of the wines is lower in acid and with softer tannins than in Chianti Classico. It’s the only Tuscan DOC to require the inclusion of Cabernet Sauvignon (up to 20%).

We’re looking forward to trying the wines from these two friends tonight. We hope you can join us!

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5pm – 8pm

February 3, 2017

Il Farneto Rio Rocca Spérgle Frisant

The name Rio Rocca comes from a valley in the province of Reggio Emilia. Spergle is an old grape variety (dating back to at least the 15th century) from the Scandiano Hills in Emilia Romagna. It was on the verge of extinction until a farmer decided to resurrect it.

Il Farneto is 8 hectares of biodiverse land and vineyards, farmed biodynamically. Spergle Frisant is made from grapes that are hand-harvested and carefully sorted. It’s unfiltered, contains little to no sulfur, and fermented with only naturally occurring yeast. It’s light and pretty, with pithy citrus notes of fresh grapefruit. It’s a lovely brunch wine or starter.

Domaine des Gandines Viré Clessé ‘Terroir de Clessé’ 2015

Domaine des Gandines is located in the middle of Maconnais, and was created by Joseph Dananchet in 1925. It is still small, now only 1.5 hectares, and still in the same family. They practice biodynamic farming, were certified organic in 2009, and say that their entire harvest is done by hand, “in a good mood”. That’s important!

Terroir de Clessé is from grapes from small vineyards in the village of Clessé. The wine is made and aged on fine lees for 12 months in 5000L barrels. It’s ripe, concentrated, and full of hazelnuts, apples, apricots, and sunshine.

Château de Brézé ‘Clos Mazurique’ Saumur Rouge 2015

We tasted the white in the shop a few weeks back; here’s the red.

Château de Brézé has been around since at least the 15th century, when it was served to royalty and aristocracy. In the 1600s, the white wines of Château de Brézé were known throughout Europe simply as Chenin de Brézé, and were held in the same regard as Sauternes and Chateau d’Yquem, to the extent that royals exchanged them annually. The Chateau just outside of Saumur is also designated as a UNESCO world heritage site.

In 2009, the new owner of the estate asked Yves Lambert and his son, Arnaud, from Domaine de Saint-Just, to manage the estate. They immediately began converting the 25 hectare property to organic farming. In a little less than a decade, they’ve restored the wines to the heights they achieved centuries ago.

‘Clos Mazurique’ is 100% Cabernet Franc grown on silty soil atop limestone rock, and fermented in concrete. It’s lively, friendly, brambly, and elegantly textured.

Masseria Guttarolo Lamie Delle Vigne 2015, Puglia, Italy

Cantine Cristiano Guttarolo is located in the former stables of an old stone farmhouse in Gioia del Colle (Jewel of the Colle), which is itself on the Murge Plateau in Puglia, about 400 meters above sea level. The winery was founded in 2004 and is certified organic, but practices biodynamic farming and natural winemaking. Many of the wines here are made in amphora; all of them are macerated on the skins for 14 – 18 days, with spontaneous fermentations with indigenous yeast, and spontaneous malolactic in the spring. The wines of Guttarolo are elegant and refined, in contrast to the frequently plodding and overripe examples of Primitivo in the region.

Lamie Delle Vigne is from a 1.5 hectare vineyard of 25+ year old vines, planted on limestone and clay. Constant sea winds and cool nights lift the aromatics and add freshness and vibrancy. The grapes are hand-harvested in late September/early October. After fermentation, it’s aged in stainless steel, then bottled without fining, filtration, or sulfur. It’s salty, sunny, and full of fresh, fleshy fruit. Have it with spaghetti and meatballs, puttanesca, hard Italian cheese, and antipasto.