Tag Archives: SelectioNaturel

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5PM – 8PM

September 1, 2017

Caneva da Nani Prosecco Col Fondo

These are the notes Wine Wizard Kat Cummings wrote a few months back, after her trip to Italy with SelectioNaturel. We’re using them again! Caneva da Nani’s Prosecco Col Fondo is made from 40 yr old glera vines grown the village of Guia high up in the Valdobbiadene of the Veneto. As glera is very vigorous, the Canello family find good equilibrium in pruning to four sticks, and produce 135 hectoliters/hectare (farming 4.5 hectares total). Soil is heavy clay (argile) on steep terraced hillsides.

Fermentation is done in glass lined cement tanks made in the 1960s. Massimo does very few rackings (2-3), choosing to stir the lees in lieu of racking or adding sulfites. Plus the biscotto di afreddimento! I just love the idea of a cooling cookie inside these epic cement tanks.

70% of Caneva’s production goes into their col fondo wine, although they also make a brut and a metodo clasico. Selection is done in the cellar, and they choose the base wine for col fondo by looking for a wine that can go through malolactic fermentation and finish dry. So they are looking for base wine with more body, that is softer and rounder.

They do multiple bottling runs because of space (or lack thereof), with the first bottling at end of December and last at end of May. The col fondo referments in bottle, on the lees, in 30 days stored in the cellar at 17-19 degrees celsius (basically they just crank the heat in the cantina and let the yeasts do their work). It needs a full 60 days to go through malo (which gets rid of harsh acids and absorbs the funky yogurt aromas), then finishes with 3 atmospheres of pressure.

I LOVE this wine because of its ethereal quality, it has a soft persistent bubble like a gentle cloud. It’s all pear and green apple and stone fruit and saffron, and develops an interesting salinity the longer it is aged in bottle. Plus it’s so good with a meat party.

The rest of the notes are mostly from the importer, Selections de la Viña.

Cerro La Barca Vegas Altas Eva de los Santos, Ribera del Guadiana, Spain

Ribera del Guadiana is in Extremadura, a region located in south-western Spain on the border of Portugal. Extramadura has been known as a place for bulk wine production, but some pioneers are finding unique new wines here. Cerro La Barca is the first organic producer in the region. They have 38 hectares of Tempranillo and the nearly extinct Eva de los Santos.

Juan Sojo and Ángel Luis González are like brothers from different mothers. One minute they’re arguing and the next they’re toasting to another harvest. They studied oenology together and ever since have been making wines together. Ángel Luis comes from a background in agriculture while Juan comes from a background in science. Both so different, but yet complement each other so well.

Fermented using indigenous yeasts in stainless steel vats where the wines naturally decant without filtration until bottling. The Eva de los Santos is from vines that are up to 80 years old. It’s flowery, fruity and perfumed on the nose, but the palate is a little more intense, with a pronounced crushed stone quality.

Cerro La Barca Vegas Altas Tempranillo, Ribera del Guadiana, Spain

Fermented using indigenous yeasts in stainless steel vats where the wines naturally decant without filtration until bottling.

This is an everyday priced winner. Dry and fruity with pleasant tannins. Good for grilling and swilling.

Companon Arrieta Rioja Alavesa “Herrigoia” Tempranillo, 2016

Who would have thought that when we started our company we would import wines from Rioja? Not us, that’s for sure. In a sense the Bordeaux of Spain, it’s a region that never really caught our attention. There’s a few historic houses that haven’t changed over the years and have maintained their identity by making wines the same way over generations but the rest are questionable. We tried but finding wines that moved us and weren’t taken already was a difficult task, like finding a needle in a haystack. Luckily, along the wine route we stumbled across Gorka and Itxaso of Compañón Arrieta. They are at the head of a rejuvenation of the region, young winegrowers recovering their families old vineyards and making wines like they used to.

Their estate is made up of 4 ha spread across 17 mini parcels, all of which bush pruned vines averaging 50 years of age under organic certification. These vineyards have been in their family for three generations but it wasn’t until 1982 that they built their bodega and started making wine. Unfortunately they weren’t bottling it, but selling it in bulk to some of the bigger houses like CVNE, El Coto, Marqués de Riscal, etc. In 2010, with Gorka and Itxaso at the helm, they started bottling their own wines under the Herrigoia label. The name is a reference to the part of Lanciego where their bodega and most of their vineyards are located. In Basque herri means town and goia means up, translated let’s just say it means uptown higher grounds resulting in fresh wines with great acidity.

Herrigoia is mostly Tempranillo, with some Viura and Malvasia, made via carbonic maceration. Delicious with cured meat and poultry.

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Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5PM – 8PM

August 4th, 2017

All Vini Conestabile Della Staffa

Notes condensed from the SelectioNaturel site: An arranged marriage in the 1700s brought together the Conestabile and Della Staffa families. The Conestabile family originated in Orvieto, the southwestern corner of Umbria, just north of Rome; the Della Staffa family dates back to antiquity and is from Perugia, close to the winery. The two noble families were interested in consolidating property and influence in what was a very poor region. In the 1800s, the property totaled over 700 hectares of agricultural land, with 100 hectares under vine. During the late 1800s and early 1900s, Conestabile della Staffa was the most important winery in the area, producing 10,000 hectoliters of wine per vintage. Remnants of this winemaking history can be seen in the castle located at the top of the hill in the village of Monte Melino. Danilo Marcucci makes the wine here, on the property he shares with his wife Alessandra.

Quoting SelectioNaturel: In the 1920’s the hamlet of Monte Melino was home to over 20 small families, each relatives of the Counts of the Conestabile della Staffa. Danilo’s wife, Alessandra is the descendant (great granddaughter) of one of these Counts. The village essentially was a self-sufficient commune/fiefdom at that point. Work and profit sharing among the families was divided equally in all sectors of the farming; raising cows, growing and drying tobacco, making wool & silk, a cobbler, a school, a metalworker, and of course olive oil and wine.

In the post-World War era wine production dramatically decreased due to the reduced workforce for farming as people moved into the cities. The last produced vintage from the old cantina was in 1956. From 1956 until 2015 no wine was produced on the property, instead the grapes were sold off to the local co-op for this entire period.

Today Conestabile della Staffa is literally being reborn, re-envisioned by the work of Danilo Marcucci. It’s an undertaking of epic proportions. Over 12 hectares of vines, many of which have been in disrepair for over a decade, but were planted in the early 1970’s. Luckily the land was never touched by chemicals.

The wines are made in the most natural way, adhering to methods that Danilo has learned over the course of 20+ years of winemaking and farming experience from some of Italy’s great ‘masters’ (Lino Maga, Eduardo Valentini, Cappellano, Vittorio Mattioli and others).  Native grapes (grechetto, trebbiano, ciliegiolo sangiovese, Gamay del Trasimeno, canaiolo, sagrantino) are the backbone of the property, a truly inspirational project with a bright future. No yeast, no chemical corrections, no sulfur. “No technology”, as Danilo would say.

The wines we’re tasting:

Brioso Rosato Frizzante: Sangiovese rosé. Direct press. Partial primary fermentation in stainless steel before early bottling and refermentation in bottle. Not disgorged. No sulfur. Crown cap finish.

Conestabile Bianco: Trebbiano and malvasia. No skin contact. Natural fermentation w/o temperature control in open-top resin vats (500 liters). Aged in fiberglass and/or stainless steel. No sulfur.

Conestabile Rosato: Cabernet franc. Direct press, ‘fior di mosto’. Natural fermentation w/o temperature control in open-top resin vats (500 liters). Aged in fiberglass. No sulfur.

Conestabile Rosso: Sangiovese. De-stemmed, 4 day maceration on the skins before pressing and aging in fiberglass. No sulfur.

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Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop – All SelectioNaturel

June 9, 2017

We’re excited about tonight’s line-up of SelectioNaturel wines, and grateful to importer Matt Mollo, and Wine Wizards rep Kat Cummings for providing us with such colorful notes for this newsletter; they make us feel like we’re there!

Fondo Bozzole Foxi Trebbiano Romagnolo 2015

Matt’s notes: Brothers Franco and Mario Accorsi are farmers at heart, more specifically they primarily cultivate orchards filled with local varieties of pears and apples. The farm was run by their grandfather Ezio who raised cows and produced cheese sold in the local markets around south eastern Lombardy. Today Franco and Mario have integrated orchard fruit production with several small parcels of old vineyards and focus on producing wines from near-lost indigenous varieties of lambrusco. All the vineyard work is done organically (certified), yields are limited and natural fermentations and low sulfur additions are key to their production. The OltrePo` Mantovano is, as the name suggests, on the banks of the Po` River Valley to the south of the village of Mantova. Soils are clay and limestone mixed with alluvial deposits left by the river. This unique and tiny DOC is the only appellation outside of Emilia-Romagna that produces true lambrusco.

Kat’s tasting notes: The thing that appeals most to me about Foxi is that it’s an entirely new experience every time I drink it. I always forget just how much I love it. It’s fresh and lively and immediate but also a little round and ever-so-slightly caramel. And dangerously easy to drink. Better to have two bottles. Also don’t you want to sing that Fergie song about it and say “foxi” instead of “flossy”

G-L-A-M-O-R-O-U-S

Rabasco Vino Rosato Cancelli 2016

Kat’s notes: Iole Rabasco is magic. She grows mostly old-vine Montepulciano (with some old-vine Trebbiano and olives and magic fagioli perle thrown in for good measure) on her 10 hectare estate in the hills of Pianella. Another wonderfully magical thing to know: there are crazy old (think 130 year old) olive trees right outside her front door. I know because I saw them when her family generously welcomed a group of loopy, wine-weary travelers into their home this spring. For dinner we were offered not only the aforementioned perle beans alongside thousands of pastas and meats, BUT ALSO bread baked by Iole’s mom, Giulia, using yeast from the second racking of Salita Rosso, Iole’s red cuvée from the ultra steep La Salita vineyard. But I digress.

Pianella is situated in the north-central corner of Abruzzo, an area blessed with a unique set of micro-climates — the Adriatic is some 40 kilometers away, offering tempering maritime influences, while the base of Gran Sasso flanks the western edge of the Rabasco property. I’m assured that some short months before our March visit there was snow piled everywhere.

No chemicals ever touch Iole’s vines or the wines in her cellar. The Rosato Cancelli is direct press Montepulciano from the Cancelli vineyard site, a bowl that starts at the base of the La Salita slalom run and jumps a small road to climb the more gentle adjacent slope. This wine is part of a serious Abruzzo tradition — no skin maceration as is the custom, a fact belied by its electric raspberry hue. In 2016, Iole opted to ferment the rosato in cement and then age in stainless steel (rather than her classic fiberglass damigiana used in years past), producing a super fresh and vibrant wine laced with tension and electricity. This isn an all year round, family sort of wine, meant for pairing with whatever brings your family to the table. It is pure joy, refined and elegant but still ready to dance barefoot at the end of the night. To recap, it is magic. – Kat Cummings

Ceppaiolo:

Matt’s notes: This tiny property acts as the purest, most rudimentary “laboratory” for Danilo Marcucci’s natural wine designs. Here no compromise is taken. Given the exceedingly small scale of the property, 4 rows of vines that total less than 1 hectare, Danilo and his friend Riccardo can do things on a different wavelength…no time frames, no yielding. The beauty of Ceppaiolo is that it displays the classic “contrasto Italiano” with clarity…plain and simple, Ceppaiolo is a dump. Nothing more then a run down cement farm house that lies mostly in disrepair with bombed out old Fiats and farm equipment scattered around the property. There’s no electricity, no bathroom. Just a 4 rows of some of the oldest, rarest and most ‘antique’ varieties of Umbrian vines, all white, that can be found in the region; trubiano (trebbiano dorato), malvasia bianca, grechetto, fumaiola (a rare variety of verdicchio), uva pecora, san colombana. Winemaking is beyond rudimentary…no pumping, nothing more then 1 old barrel, a couple resin tanks, a cement vat and some demijohns. Here the ‘terroir’ is not the soil or the altitude but the old vine material and the vision of Danilo and Riccardo, basta.

Ceppaiolo Bianco 2105: All the white varieties, harvested fully mature. De-stemmed, skin contact for 2 days. Aged in resin and bottle.

Ceppaiolo Rosso 2014: Sangiovese, Vernaccia rossa, canaiolo. 10 days skin maceration, aged in old barrel and bottle. No sulfur.

Here’s the whole newsletter.

Fümp!Fest at Bucktown! Friday, May 5th!

bucktown fump festRain will force fizzy festivities indoors, but that won’t dampen the fun! Come get fried chicken by the piece or bucket, and fizzy by the glass or bottle!

Wine Wizards and SelectioNaturel will be in attendance, and rumor has it that Fümp t-shirts exist for a lucky few! Show up at Bucktown after 5pm, and pretend you’re on a sunny Italian hillside. Why not?

 

Tastings are Fun

Our fall in-shop tastings have been a blast!

Joe Swick, pouring some Pacific Northwest magic.

Joe Swick (in plaid), pouring some Pacific Northwest magic.

Alvaro from Selctions de la Viña teaching us all about Spanish natural wine.

Alvaro from Selctions de la Viña teaching us all about Spanish natural wine.

Garret Vandermolen of The Sorting Table kicking off Farmer Fizz Fridays on November 18th. Grower-Champagne is the only Champagne worth drinking!

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Matt Mollo of SelectioNaturel, pouring small production, lo-fi wines from Italy.

verde-vineyards

It’s Giacomo (Jim) Verde of RI’s own Verde Vineyards and Meng!

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5pm-8pm

Fausto Cellario with custom-label Barbera Frizzante

Fausto Cellario with custom-label Barbera Frizzante

This week, we just can’t get enough of a good thing! Our special Tuesday tasting with Piemonte producer Fausto Cellario and SelectioNaturel was a smashing success! But many of our Friday regulars were sad to miss this line-up, so we’re bringing it back tonight. Unfortunately, we can’t come close to Fausto’s charm and personal experience with the wines, but we’ll do our best. We may even break out a fake Italian accent, if that helps.

Fausto & Cinzia Cellario are 3rd generation winemakers in the village of Carru` on the western outskirts of the Langhe, in Piedmont, Italy. They only work with local, indigenous grapes & uphold local winemaking traditions both in the vineyard & the cellar. They have 30 hectares spread across 5 different vineyard sites, including some in Novello, Monforte, and Dogliani; they are considered to be Dolcetto specialists. Work here is organic & all the fermentations take place with indigenous yeasts. Sulfur is only added in tiny quantities at bottling, if necessary.

2014 Cellario Langhe Favorita

Favorita is an old white grape variety indigenous to Langhe & Roero. It is genetically identical to Pigato and Vermentino from Liguria. The grape does well in poor, sandy soils and makes for fresh, floral and fruity wines, sometimes with a touch of saltiness. The 2014 is a bit fuller and fruitier than the 2013, and is it possible we like it even more? Yes it is.

2014 Cellario Langhe Dolcetto

Cellario Dolcetto is fresh, bright & juicy, with pure, vibrant fruit, like plums and cherries. This is a wine for pizza, pasta & casual meals, but this happy little red could easily find a place on your holiday table. It has just the right balance of juiciness and acidity to be the foil to fatty fall/winter fare.

2014 Cellario Barbera Frizzante

This is the 2nd Barbera Frizzante we get to have in our shop, and we couldn’t be happier. Hey, we’re a place that stacks Grignolino – we got this! This dry, effervescent little red is a Lambrusco lovers dream; the light sparkling is the result of a refermentation in the bottle. If you want to look like you know what you’re doing, drink it chilled out of a mason jar, like Piedmontese old-timers and hipsters do.

2013 Barbera “Sabinot”

Barbera was once known as ‘the people’s wine’ of Piedmont, because of its versatility and its abundant production. It can make anything from light and spritzy wine (see above) to deep, dark, brooding wines, that need years of cellaring before they’re ready to drink. The grape ripens relatively late, but maintains high levels of refreshing acidity.

Sabinot is the name of an old plot of Barbera vines in Dogliani, and it’s here that they get the grapes for this wine. This is a little more serious than Cellario’s Dolcetto; it’s deeper, the flavors more concentrated, the tannins a bit more pronounced. It’s still plummy, and fruit-driven, but it’s like the older brother who’s seen some stuff, whereas the Dolcetto is still all wide-eyed and innocent. We love them both.

This Sunday, Nov. 9th, 2-5PM: Don’t Miss The Mind of a Chef at Cable Car Cinema & Café!

Mezzanine_134Come watch episodes of The Mind of a Chef featuring David Chang, and nosh on handmade cheeses, saucisson, hen-of-the-woods terrine, buckwheat donuts and more, prepared by the Man, the Myth…the Mulligan! Chris Mulligan. You know him well from The Proper Binge; an Afternoon with Julia Child. Now come see what Chang inspires!

We’ll be pouring a slew of wines (and one French cider) including some from SelectioNaturel, Zev Rovine, Neal Rosenthal and MORE! Click here for a full description and here to purchase tickets.

$40/21+

Cable Car Cinema & Cafe
204 South Main Street
Providence, RI 02903
401-272-3970

 

Try Some Wine in the Shop Tonight, 5-8PM!

Il Saliceto

Il Saliceto

2013 Il Saliceto “Falistra” Lambrusco di Sorbara

This is an unusual Lambrusco produced by Gian Paolo Isabella (most well-known as a decorated Muay Thai champion) and his brother-in-law Marcello. They founded this 4 hectare estate in 2005, in the tiny village of Campogalliano, on the outskirts of Modena (Emilia-Romagna region). They are dedicated to working with traditional local grapes such as Lambrusco di Sorbara and Salamino, but they also work with the less common Malbo Gentile, from which they make an oaked, savory wine, capable of aging for up to a decade. All farming here is done organically and the Lambrusco’s are produced via natural vinification and re-fermentations in bottle.

Falistra means spark, and that is an apt description of this wine. Any notion of Lambrusco being sweet should be thrown out the window. This is dry, lively and super-pale-pink. It’s unfiltered, so it pours cloudy, which just makes it that much prettier. The fruit here is delicate, and the overall impression is of tart minerality and slightly rustic earthiness. This is a great wine to wet the appetite or to pair with plates of antipasto.

2013 Guild Columbia Valley White Wine, Oregon

The Columbia Valley AVA lies mostly in Washington state, with a tiny slice of it in Oregon. Guild is “a cooperative of four Portland, Oregon vintners producing wines of exceptional value for the masses”. The Guild cooperative is tiny, just 4 winemakers:John Grochau, Grochau Cellars; Vincent Fritzsche, Vincent Wine Company; Anne Hubatch, Helioterra Wines; Patrick “X”, Hammer & Tongs. Guild white is a blend of Pinot Gris (60%), Sauvignon Blanc (25%), and Riesling (15%). Production is just 750 cases, so the aforementioned “masses” must be rather small, when you think about it. But no matter, this wine is crisp and loaded with citrus upfront, from lemon to grapefruit. The Pinot Gris fleshes is out and gives the wine weight. The Riesling adds zingy acidity and the Sauvignon Blanc brings the tropical fruit.All in all this is a satisfying, versatile, very food friendly wine.

2012 Cellario Langhe Dolcetto

cellario dolcetto

Fausto & Cinzia Cellario are 3rd generation winemakers in the village of Carru` on the western outskirts of the Langhe. They only work with local, indigenous grapes & uphold local winemaking traditions both in the vineyard & the cellar. Work here is organic & all the fermentations take place with indigenous yeasts. Sulfur is only added in tiny quantities at bottling, if necessary.

Cellario is fresh, bright & juicy, with pure, vibrant fruit, like plums and cherries. Pizza, pasta & casual meals are the perfect pair for this happy little wine.

2012 Ermitage du Pic Saint Loup “Tour de Pierre”

The Ravailles brothers (Xavier, Pierre, and Jean-Marc) are descendants of a family that has been in Pic Saint Loup, in Languedoc-Roussillon, for over 1,000 years. The hermitage dates from the Middle Ages, as the former home of the bishops of Maguelone. The three brothers planted vines here in 1992; until then, the region was mostly known for sheep farming and cheese production. They have been practicing biodynamic farming since 1999 and were certified organic in 2012.

This wine is a blend of Syrah, Grenache & Mouvedre. It’s briny and stony, with precise fruit and crackling acidity. Think black olives and fresh raspberries ground up with a rock and a dash of salt and you have something approaching this red. It’s wild, memorable, and a little bit addictive.