Tag Archives: wine shop

Friday Wine Tasting in the shop, 5-8PM

May 19, 2017

Domaine Philemon Perlé Gaillac Blanc 

perle

Perlé Gaillac Blanc is all fresh deliciousness. It’s 60% Loin de L’oeil, 20% Muscadelle and 20% Sauvignon Blanc. The property in southwest France has been in the Vieules family for over 200 years; today Mathieu Vieules grows wheat, sunflowers and grapes in equal proportion.

This wine is the perfect aperitif or accompaniment to warm-weather food: it’s lively, citrusy, ever-so-slightly spritzy, and balanced out by a bit of garden herbs and green apple. And it’s well under 15 bucks.

 

AJ Adam Riesling Trocken 2015, Mosel 

Here’s a good telling of the Andreas Adam story. And here are more notes from the importer (clearly we’re too hot for writing): This Estate Trocken (Gutsriesling) is entirely from Dhron. Like a good Bourgogne Blanc it’s sourced from several top vineyards to make a wine that speaks to the vintage, region and style of the producer. The fruit harvested was very clean and at about 79 oechsle, similar to his Hofberg Kabinett. Fermented with spontaneous yeast in stainless steel and a bit of old fuder, the fermentation stopped at 7 grams of RS, “where it finds it’s balance”.

Champagne Moutard Brut Grand Cuvée NV

The Moutard family has been farming in Buxeuil, in the Côte des Bar since 1642, and has been making wine since 1927. In addition to Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier, they also grow heirloom varieties Petit Meslier and Arbanne on their 20 hectares of vines. Grand Cuvée is 100% Pinot Noir, and like all the champagne produced at Moutard, it spends a minimum of 3 years on the lees. It’s a rich, ripe, and approachable style, with nuts and brioche on the nose, and a creamy texture. At under $40, it’s very affordable farmer fizz.

Étienne Courtois L’Icaunais 2013, Loire

Notes from the importer:  Claude Courtois has created a small farm which exemplifies what biodynamic is in terms of biodiversity and self-sufficiency, although he does not consider himself to be a biodynamic grower. He farms a balanced & completely chemical free 13-hectares of vines in the heart of the VDP Sologne. Courtois also grows organic wheat, which he feeds to his cows. “Nothing comes into my vineyard,” he says, meaning no chemicals ever. He has created a well-balanced, bio-diversity with trees, fruit trees, vines, woods, and fields. No pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, chemical fertilizers, or synthetic chemicals of any kind are allowed on the vines or in the soil of the vineyards. He has his own methods for promoting the diverse life of the soil. The grapes—Gamay, Cabernet Franc, Côt (Malbec), Cabernet Sauvignon, Sauvignon Blanc & Pineau d’ Aunis—are harvested by hand and only indigenous yeasts are used during fermentation. Claude regards the soil on his farm as a living organism. He lives in harmony with nature and the wines he crafts are a pure and vibrant testament to outstanding Biodynamic winemaking.

Claude, who is growing older, has started to pass off the winemaking to his son Etienne, who is already showing immense promise…read more.

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM: Vineyard Road

May 12, 2017

Tonight Peter Buckley of Vineyard Road is in the shop with two French producers. We’ll taste a couple wines from Gilles Bonnefoy in Cotes de Forez, and another two from Domaine Leliévre in Lorraine.

Vineyard Road Selection

Gilles Bonnefoy’s Les Vin de la Madone is situated so far on the Loire River that it’s actually closer to Beaujolais. Côtes du Forez is located on a geological fault formed in the Tertiary Period when Africa pushed into Europe and formed the Alps. There are up to 105 volcanoes in the greater area of AOC Volcanique Du Massif Central; thirty of them are in Côtes du Forez, and Gilles’ vineyards (in both Cotes du Forez and Urfé) are situated around two of them. So volcanic soil plays a big role here. Gilles has been tending vines here since 1997. He biodynamically farms 8 hectares in the village of Champdieu. Seventy-five percent of his vines are planted on volcanic soils of Urfé, the rest are on clay and granite.

Domaine Lelièvre is located in Cotes de Toul, Lorraine. The Lelièvre family goes back generations here, to the time when Romans first planted vines. At one time Cotes de Toul, situated just 60 miles south of the German border, was a thriving wine-production region, covering parts of Alsace and Lorraine. It was famous for Riesling (this makes sense, as it’s located on the western banks of Moselle River–follow it north and you’re in Mosel, Germany) and as a source of base wine for Champagne. Unfortunately the region was ravaged by phylloxera, war, rabid industrialization and poor vineyard management. During the First World War the German occupation, and subsequent liberation by the Allies, left most of the vineyards as battle trenches. The final blow came in 1919, when a law was passed restricting the name champagne to the wines made from grapes grown in the region of Champagne. By 1951 there were only 30 hectares of vineyards left and most of the wine was bottled by negotiants. In 1998, a handful of remaining vignerons fought for and won AOC status. The Lelièvres were one of the producers to champion the region. After the famous 1971 vintage, Jean Lelièvre decided to no longer sell to negotiants and to bottle everything at the estate. From there the family started to rebuild, replant and recapture the glory of Lorraine. It is still an obscure little region, with most of the wine staying within the area, and very little of it leaving France. Lelièvre makes about 1100 cases annually, and they’re one of the most well known producers in the area.

The wines, not necessarily in order:

Madone Sauvignon Gris et Blanc de Madone, VdP Urfé, 2014
60% Sauvignon Blanc and 40% Sauvignon Gris, this is an elegant, clean, mineral-driven beauty. Delicate, rocky, with echoes of Sancerre and Aligoté. Think seafood and summer, should we ever see the sun.

Gamay de Bouze and Gamay Noir de Madone, Gamays sur Volcan VdP Urfé, 2014
A blend of two varieties of teinturier (red-fleshed) Gamay, this is a vibrant wine full of cherries, bright acidity, barely-there tannins, and a touch of dried herbs. Sauçissons, roast chicken, fresh and grilled veggies…

Domaine Lelièvre Gris de Toul Rosé, 2015
A blend of 90% Gamay and 10% Pinot Noir from the producers best plots located in Lucey, Bruley, Blénod les Toul and Buligny. The well-drained clayey slopes are protected from the wet winds coming from the West. Grapes were hand-harvested and vinified separately in stainless steel, matured briefly on the lees, and then assembled just before bottling. This wine is salty, tart, tangy, bright; pink grapefruit up front and a dash of cherry on the finish. Delicious. It might be a little too delicate to handle spicy food, but it’s game for just about anything else. Just fill a glass!

Domaine Lelievre, Sparkling Gamay Rosé Leucquois
Come on, it’s fizzy Gamay with a bunny on the label. Fun, crushable, puts a little hop in your step in the midst of grey days. Glug-glug!

Click here for more info on events and new arrivals.

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5pm – 8pm

Oct. 7, 2016

Chateau Graville Lacoste Graves Blanc, 2013

75% Sémillon, 20% Sauvignon Blanc, 5% Muscadelle

Hervé Dubourdieu makes white bordeaux and Sauternes on his 13 hectare property. Founded in 1890, the vineyards are just across the road from 1st Growth Chateau Climens, and on a similar soil of calcerous clay, fissured rock, red iron, limestone, and flinty gravel. He farms sustainably. This wine is made from 50 year old vines, it’s dry and elegant, rich and minerally, with a very aromatic nose and a long, clean finish. This is a lovely go-to bottle for all kinds of fare, but pairs especially well with fish, chicken and creamy sauces.

Marc Pesnot “La Boheme” Melon de Bourgogne, 2015

Marc Pesnot organically farms (converting to biodynamic) 13 hectares of fifty year old Melon de Bourgogne vines near the city of Nantes, on the western edge of the Loire. His old vines thrive in schist rich soils, adding depth and character to his wines.

Harvest here is by hand, and at maximum ripeness. The fruit undergoes a slow manual pressing and rests on its lees for at least 9 months. There’s lots of refreshing acidity in this wine, tempered by pears, green apple, crushed stones and a touch of creaminess. Pairs nicely with shellfish, salads, chicken, and light appetizers.

Vin de Pays de Vaucluse Rouge “Cuvée Kermit Lynch” 2015

This wine is made by the Leydier family of Domaine de Durban in Beaumes-de-Venise. Famous for their Muscat, the Leydier’s sustainably farm 55 hectares of vineyards and also make Gigondas and Beaumes-de-Venise Rouge. The property, surrounded by pine trees that protect it from mistral winds, has been a working farm since 1159; it sits at high elevation with a cooler micro-climate than the rest of the southern Rhone, which lends freshness and finesse to the wines. The Vaucluse Rouge is the wine the family drinks by the jugful. t’s vibrant, fresh and fruity, with a touch of tannins on the finish.

Clos Bagatelle “Jardin de Bagatelle” Saint Chinian Rouge 2012

This is a Grenache/Syrah/Mourvedre blend from a brother and sister team. Christine and Luc Simon took over from their mother, Marie-Françoise, who ran the estate since 1963. Christine and Luc are meticulous in the vineyards and the cellar. Vines are planted on clay-limestone soil, with some shale plots. Summers are hot and dry, resulting in small grapes with thick skins. In the case of Jardin de Bagatelle, these conditions lead to a wine that is full of warm-stone minerality and dark, spicy fruit, with a touch of garrigue. Perfect for cooler nights and heartier dishes.

RAW WINE AT THE STEEL YARD, SATURDAY JUNE 11th, 5:30pm – 9pm

Raw Wine 2016
RAW WINE AT THE STEEL YARD 2016

Come explore the deliciousness and variety of raw wine in the raw beauty of a historic, reclaimed industrial space while raising funds for the Steel Yard and its’ programs.
The 3rd annual Raw Wine Tasting is hosted by Campus Fine Wines, the go-to shop for small-production, natural and organic wines in Providence.
This is the only event of its kind in RI; nowhere else will you be able to sample a richer or more diverse set of wines made by hand in small lots, by real people, from wine regions around the world.
Campus Fine Wines and the Steel Yard share the core belief in a world made by hands, where production is crafted and producers are connected to their audience, enriching our lives and creating cultural and economic value. Support this mission, and the Yard. Special Thanks to our event sponsors, the Compost Plant!
Matt Mollo of SelectioNaturel, Jenny Lefcourt of Jenny & François Selections, Zev Rovine of Zev Rovine Selections, Adam Wilson of European Cellars, Chase Granoff of Indie Wineries, Ralph Catillo ofMontebruno Wine, Niklas Peltzer of Meinklang, Leigh Ranucci of Wine Traditions…
More things to look forward to aside from the wine!
Oysters, and serious BBQ – for carnivores and vegetarians alike – made in a Steel Yard crafted smoker, courtesy of the Compost Plant, Ocean State BBQ Festival and Ocean State Oyster Festival. Daniele Prosciutto carved up by Diego Perez. Big Caesar Salad and cured fish prepared by Oberlin.
Edible bread Sculpture by Seven Stars Bakery, desserts by North Bakery, Presto Strange O coffee, tea and juice truck, door prizes, metalworking demos and more…
Tickets are $50 in advance, $60 week of and at the door. Available here. 
*$35 from every ticket is a fully tax-deductible donation to the Steel Yard.

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop – All California – 5pm-8pm

Iconic Wine “Sidekick” Chardonnay
2014, California

cali wines 1 29From the producers website:
The SK Series from Iconic Wine represents the finest wine we could create at everyday drinking value. We work with multiple vineyard sources from around northern California, as far north as Anderson Valley to as far south as Lodi. This allows us every year to assure we pull the best fruit for the price depending on the vintage, creating a trustworthy wine and perfect companion to you day to day adventures.

Iconic was founded on a love of Chardonnay. It was the very first wine we ever made, and we are very picky when it comes to this great grape. Like our flagship Chardonnay, Heroine, the focus is on fresh bright fruit and minerality. The grapes are slowly pressed over a long gentle pressing before fermented in vertical, temperature controlled stainless steel tanks. The wine is apricot and white peach and full of floral aromatics.

Qupé “A Modern White” 2014 Central Coast Blend

Qupé calls itself a “modern stone age winery”. Started in 1981 by original Rhone Ranger Bob Lindquist, Qupé is so named to honor the Chumash, the indigenous people of the Golden State’s Central Coast and Channel Islands. The word means poppy, a plant traditionally used for food and medicine. Bob and his wife Louisa Sawyer Lindquist are skilled in biodynamics, and their Sawyer Lindquist Vineyard is certified Demeter Biodynamic and Stellar Organic.

“A Modern White” is a blend of Chardonnay, Viognier & Marsanne. The Viognier was harvested slightly late for richness and a touch of sweetness. The Chardonnay and Marsanne were harvested a bit early for freshness, crispness and acidity. This is a food friendly, ripe and fruity (though not sweet) white wine with lots of richness, body and depth.

Hobo Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel, 2013

Kenny Likitprakong started Hobo Wine Company in 2002, at the age of 26. He grew up in Healdsburg, spending much time at Domaine St. George, the winery owned by his great-uncle Supasit Mahaguna. Kenny’s father Somchai was also involved at the winery, having been summoned there by Mahaguna while studying in NY.

Likitprakong sells his wines under three labels: Banyan Wines, Hobo and Folk Machine, all of them under the umbrella of the Hobo Wine Co. He doesn’t own any vines, instead he gets fruit from top sources, although he does farm about an acre of Branham Estate Rockpile Vineyard Zinfandel.

Fromthe start, Likitprakong intended to make lower sugar, lower alcohol, higher acid, more food friendly wiines than what was being produced in California at the time. In 2008, Gary Branham said that Likitprakong was “already doing more avant-garde things than most people do in their whole careers.”

Producers notes: The Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel is an “appellation wine” and we attempt to make a wine that represents what we think the appellation is; rich, but not overripe, fruit-forward, but not a bomb, structured, but not tannic. The 2013 is a blend of Treborce, Larrick, Wellstone, and Branham Vineyards. We continue to cover the geographical and climatic diversity that the appellation has to offer from the far North Rockpile part of the Dry Creek Valley to the Southern most border of the appellation. It is our belief that the multiple sites and climates and soil types give us a representation of the appellation and a variety of different expressions and flavors.

Brea Cabernet Sauvignon 2012 “Margarita Vineyard” Paso Robles

Brea is a project between winemaker Chris Brockway of Broc Cellars and Tim Elenteny of TE Imports. This wine is 75% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Cabernet Franc & 5% Petit Verdot planted on granitic shale and uplifted seabed. Farming is sustainable, fermentation is spontaneous, and the wine spends 20 months in 100% used French oak barrels. Margarita Vineyard is located at 1000 ft elevation and 15 miles from the Pacific. Some consider this area too cool to make Cabernet, but the cooler maritime climate means a longer growing season. The resulting wine is elegant, soft, refined. Not so much a California powerhouse as a subtle expression of minerality and terroir. It’s really pretty gorgeous.

Friday Tasting in the Shop, 5pm – 8pm

Di Lenardo Pinot Grigio Ramato “Gossip” 2014

The Di Lenardo estate produces wines from its four large (150 hectares) family owned vineyards situated in Ontagnano, in the heart of the Friuli region in the foothills of the Alps, as well as from rented vineyards in Aquileia and Manzano. The estate was established in 1878, and has been for many years now under the direction of winemaker Massimo “Max” Di Lenardo. All the fruit here is hand-harvested and the winery is 100% solar powered.

2012 was the first vintage of Di Lenardo Ramato, and only about 1600 cases are made each year. We’ve carried every vintage in the shop, and this 2014 just arrived, so we just have to crack it open!

Ramato is an old-school style of Pinot Grigio, made by allowing the grape skins to stay in the mix with the juice during the maceration. This contact with the skins gives the wine its ramato, or copper-pink hue. Sometimes called a baby orange wine, Ramato-style wines are more compellingly aromatic and texturally interesting than a Pinot Grigio made without skin contact. They’re also quite food friendly, especially with seafood.

Clos de la Roilette, Fleurie 2014

Clos de la Roilette covers nine hectares of one of the best slopes in the Beaujolais Crus. The clos (walled estate, although there’s no wall here…) borders the Moulin-à-Vent appellation and produces wines known both for their youthful beauty and for their ability to age gracefully. Depending on the vintage, the wines here can typically be laid down for 5, 10 years, or more.

Fernando Coudert bought the estate in 1967; since the mid-80s, his son Alain has been making the wines. The terroir (mainly clay and manganese), and the age of their vines (upwards of 40 years) contribute to the richness and depth of their wines. Farming here is by hand and lutte raisonnée (sustainable, or reasoned fight). Vinification is the traditional, semi-carbonic Beaujolais style with indigenous yeast.

The 2014 vintage was a little rough at first but was saved by bright and sunny weather in August and September. This wine is a reflection of the vintage: it’s pure, bright fruit, light on its feet, and balanced. It may not be one to put away for a decade, but it could handle 5 or so years just fine. Or drink it now. Why not?

Catherine & Pierre Breton Bourgueil “Trinch!” 2013, Loire

The Bretons were on the forefront of the natural wine movement in the Loire back in the early 90s. Their organically farmed vineyards are now moving toward biodynamic certification.

Trinch! (“Cheers” in German) is from a 5 hectare plot of 30 year-old Cabernet Franc vines grown on gravel. Hand-harvested, wild yeast, little to no sulphur (like all Breton wines), and vilified in stainless steel, this is the Breton Bourgueil meant for earlier consumption and casual bistro-style meals.

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM

Roederer Estate Brut, Anderson Valley, CA

Roederer Estate was established in 1982 by Jean-Claude Rouzaud, then president of Louis Roederer, and 5th generation descendant of the founder.  Rouzaud believed that estate-owned vineyards were essential for producing top quality wine, so he searched for years before purchasing this 580-acre Anderson Valley vineyard. They only grow Chardonnay and Pinot Noir here. Farming is organic and biodynamic. They are highly selective here and only about 70% of the pressed juice makes it into the final cuvée. The addition of reserve wines defines the Roederer style, which is known for its“body, finesse and depth of flavor”.

Kruger-Rumpf Riesling Trocken 2013, Nahe, Germany

You may remember this from our Thanksgiving picks. We realized we never got around to tasting it in the shop, but it is so good, we’re doing it now! Kruger-Rumpf was founded in 1790 and nearly 200 years later, in 1984, Stefan Rumpf took over the estate. Now, Stefan’s son Georg helps out with the operation. Farming is sustainable, harvest is by hand, and fermentation is short to preserve the fresh fruit character of the wine. This Riesling is pristine & dry (trocken). On the nose you get roses and peaches; on the palate it’s a tangy, twangy, sweet and sour symphony. The finish is lush and lip-smackingly delicious!

2013 Broc Carignan, Alexander Valley, CA

Chris Brockway makes site-specific, natural wines out of a “low-wattage, urban winery”.

This wine is from sustainably-grown Carignan, made via carbonic maceration (common in Beaujolais). This technique produces wines that are vivid, lively and totally crushable.

2012 Paterna Chianti Colli Aretini DOCG

Here’s another wine from SelectioNaturel and boy do we love it! Read about the producer here (three hippy couples and some “old toothless Italian guys”-ha!) and then come try the wine. It’s that lovely, rustic, dusty Sangiovese (mostly) that we just want to drink and drink and drink….with some old toothless Italian guys! Sounds like heaven.