Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5pm-8pm

September 28, 2018

Bohigas Catalonia Xarel-lo 2017

The Bohigas family traces its roots back to the 13th century at this site in Catalonia. In the 1930s the great-uncle of the current owner (Jordi Casanovas Bohigas) started making Cava, for which they became well-known. The 110 acres are planted to 10 varieties and are farmed organically, and grapes are harvested by hand.

This Xarel-lo is an easy drinking wine, with mango, lime, apples, and a leesy, stony finish.

Garo’Vin Vin de France “Lunatic” Chenin Blanc 2016

Cedric Garreau is a “micro-vigneron” with just under 3 hectares of vines around Beaulieu-sur-Layon. He makes tiny amounts of wine in a small stone building across from his home at the edge of the vineyards, which are all certified organic. Cedric’s winemaking is traditional, with mostly old, used equipment that he gets from his larger neighbors when they buy the new stuff.

The Chenin vines from this parcel are 35 years old and grow in purple schist soils. The wine is just grapes, nothing added, no sulfur at any point. Aging is 10 months in barrel. This is a big, aromatic, dry Chenin Blanc that’s full of honey, herbs, citrus and smoke.

Domaine Thillardon “Raisin Libre” Beaujolais 2017

Paul Henri Thillardon biodynamically farms nearly 6 hectares of vines in Chenas, the smallest of the ten Beaujolais Crus in the far north of the region, situated west of Moulin-A-Vent. His vineyards are located on a plateau of pink granite around the Castle Boccards in the town of La Chapelle-de-Guinchay. Raisin Libre is Gamay fermented with indigenous yeast and via 100% carbonic maceration. It’s fresh, fruity, and gluggable.

Domaine du Chapitre “Mon Plasir”, IGP Coteaux de l’Ardèche 2016

Frédéric Dorthe runs his family’s 20ha of vineyards located on the right bank of the Rhône River in the town of Saint-Marcel d’Ardèche. His family has had long-standing contracts to sell most of the fruit to negociants and other winemakers, but Fred keeps some grapes for himself, from which he makes tiny amounts of drinkable, humble little wines, like “Mon Plasir”. All wines here are aged in cement with no additives except a dash of SO2 at bottling.

Mon Plasir is 60% Grenache, 30% Cinsault, and 10% Syrah from vines at least 40 years old. It’s another easygoing wine, light, and fruity, but earthy too. The producer’s website calls it a “Wine of conviviality” which sounds about right. Only 440 cases produced.