Wine Tasting in the Shop!

¡Hola!

Who needs wine and pleasant diversions?! We do!! Tonight in the shop, Alvaro de la Viña will be here with not one, not two, but THREE of the winemakers he represents through his importing company Selections de la Viña. We first came across Alvaro back in late 2012 or early 2013, but it took far too long to get his delicious, place-driven, honest wines into little Rhody. Now we have a bunch! Swing by tonight to swirl, sip, and meet the people who make what’s in your glass. You’re bound to find something that would be just right for your holiday table, too.

Our Friday wine tasting is still happening tomorrow, 5-8PM, so save room in the schedule. Nick Zeiser from Wine Wizards (who also reps Selections de la Viña in RI) will be pouring a line-up of Hermann J. Wiemer wines from the Finger Lakes, NY. These too, will pair quite well with the cornucopia of flavors that pile up like autumn leaves on Thanksgiving tables.

And this Saturday in the shop, 3-6PM, Matt Thomas from Sierra Nevada will host our beer tasting.

¡Salud!

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM

Nov. 2, 2018

Christin from Wine Bros pours this fun and funky line-up!

Fable Farm Fermentory “Leo” 2017 Barnard, Vermont

Fable Farm Fermentory is a farm-based winery producing aged wines and vinegars, among other herbal elixirs. It’s a collective effort of many folks, including Christopher Piana, Andrew White, and Jon Piana, located in the foothills of the Green Mountains in Barnard, VT. Their farm is a mosaic of fields, forests, and gardens rich with ecological diversity situated at 1700 feet, atop the Broad Brook watershed. They work cooperatively with partner farmers and advocates to steward the historic Clark Farm. Now conserved by the Vermont Land Trust, this 450 acre haven is a living legacy of the european settlers who sculpted small farms out of an old-growth wilderness back in the late 1700’s. Over the last five years, Fable Farm has grafted and grown hundreds of cider-specific apple and pear trees in nursery beds peppered around Barnard. Fable Farm is a fermentory, a venue, and a culinary company providing farm fresh prepared foods for various cultural events held on the farm.

Leo is a dry, sparkling, orange wine made from 40% Le Crescent grapes & 60% cider apples. Half of the grapes were placed into an open top vessel directly from the destemmer for a partial whole berry maceration and the other half was pressed immediately. This “orange” wine contains both the macerated and non-macerated La Crescent grape fermentations, blended with a carefully selected multi-year entourage of cider barrels. They dissolved in Barnard-bred maple syrup at bottling for a traditional method sparkling at 9.5% abv.

Domaine de Grisy Bourgogne Blanc 2016, Burgundy
(late addition, not pictured)

Domaine de Grisy is a 22 acre vineyard located in the northern part of Burgundy near Chablis in the town of Saint-Bris-le-Vineux. Way up north in the Côtes d’Auxerre, Pascal Sorin’s family has been making wine here for 18 generations. He currently runs the estate with his wife. Fermented in stainless steel with indigenous yeast. Sustainably farmed Chardonnay vines located just south of Chablis in Côtes d’Auxerre. Chalky soil. Aged in stainless steel and bottled with minimal additions. Soils are Kimmeridgian clay and limestone. The 2017 vintage has a pale yellow color, with aromas of white flowers, almonds and toast. On the palate the great minerality brings out the typicity of our soils with a creamy side, then finish on the flavors of honey.

Domaine Mamaruta Fitou, France

Domaine Mamaruta is a small estate situated near the Pyrenees mountain range, facing the Mediterranean Sea. Producer Marc Castan describes this area as looking like paradise, and is determined to make the best wine he can with as little impact on the environment as possible. Marc inherited vines from his grandfather, and at first worked for the village cooperative. He quickly learned that this kind of intensive farming wasn’t for him. In 2009 he started his own winery, with the objective of bringing the vineyard back to life after years of industrial farming. Nowadays Domaine Mamaruta is 14ha and is entirely located near the shores of the villages of La Palme and Leucate. Many different terroirs can be found in the area with a mix of sand and pebbles at water-level, and dry, compact lime-stone soils on the cliffs’ plateau. Yields are very low, partly due to pruning style, and partly due to the harsh, dry environment. Varieties planted are Carignan noir and blanc, Mouvèdre, Syrah, Grenache noir and gris, as well as Macabeu and Muscat Petit Grains. There is usually more than one grape variety in the same plot because the preference here throughout generations has been to replace a dead vine with another vine, whatever the variety, rather than leave a hole in the row.

Marc works methodically, by hand, and makes biodynamic tinctures from plants like chamomile, lavender, rosemary, dandelion or nettle, which are planted amongst the rows, along with other flowers and beneficial plants. These are used along with clippings from the vines to make compost. The property is also home to Marc’s dozen or so Highland cows, and two donkeys, which are referred to as the “lawnmowers”. The animals graze between the rows and provide natural fertilizer to the ecosystem.

Un Grain de Folie Rosé 2017

A rosé made from 60% Syrah and 40% other varietals from the estate. (In 2017 it was all Carignan.) Soils are rich in limestone. Direct press into stainless steel. Native Yeasts. Kept on lees with no stirring and aged in tank for 6 months. No temperature control. Unfined and unfiltered. No added sulfites during fermentation. Vegan. 36 mg/L SO2 added at bottling. Fresh and clean, with great texture. All strawberries and minerals. Absolutely delicious.

Razzia Fitou 2017

AOP Fitou. 40% Carignan noir – 20% Grenache – 20% Cinsault – 20% Syrah. Native yeasts. Whole bunches macerated for just 7 days. After a very gentle pressing, the juice is moved to barrels to finish fermentation and rest on the lees for 5 months. Blackcurrants and dark cherries, leather, and spices characterize this wine. Unfined. Filtered. Total Sulphites: 10 mg/L

Fattoria San Lorenzo Marche “Il Casolare” Rosso 2017

50% Sangiovese / 50% Montepulciano fermented in concrete tanks with native yeasts. Il Casolare Rosso is Natalino’s ‘red wine for the people.’ Natalino, the wine maker declassifies this ‘Piceno’ as an IGT in order to save on costs, keeping the price as low as possible. The wine is fresh, clean, balanced, easy to drink, and certified organic. Fattoria San Lorenzo is a third generation family winery that is completely organic and biodynamic. Enrico Crognaletti was a master cooper who founded the estate, and handed it down to his son Gino, who spent his life filling the vineyards of his estate with the best clones of Verdicchio from around the area. Gino left the estate to Natalino Crognaletti, who’s been running things ever since. Under Natalino’s guidance, the estate has seen its wines imported to all corners of the globe, and developed to become standard bearers for the Marche. All the vineyards are organically and biodynamically farmed, and are certified organic for wine and olive oil production. All of the farming is done by hand to best preserve the soil, vines and the larger environment.

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop with Chris Wichern + German Wine; 5-8PM

Oct. 26, 2018

Hild Elbling, Mosel, Germany

Matthias Hild farms 5 hectares of old, terraced parcels of Elbling in Upper-Mosel, a place a bit more known for quantity over quality, with most of the grapes going to cooperatives. Elbling is an ancient grape (one of Europe’s oldest) that is still planted in this region, though not much anywhere else. Its history isn’t known for certain, but it’s either indigenous to Germany, or was brought there by the Romans nearly 2,000 years ago. DNA testing links it to Gouais Blanc, an ancient variety of white grape planted in Northern and Central France throughout the Medieval era. It grew where Pinot and Chardonnay didn’t do well, and made simple acid-driven wines for the peasantry. It is also a descendant of Traminer, a finicky, green-skinned grape from a German speaking area in what is now northern Italy. This parentage links Elbling to Riesling, Chardonnay, and Furmint. It makes high acid, tart, low alcohol, wines and it is particularly well-suited to sparkling wines.

Unlike the famed slate vineyards of lower Mosel, the vineyards here are mostly on limestone. And where Riesling makes up over 60% of grapes planted in Mosel, Elbling is the least planted, at just under 6%. It’s more a labor of love for Hild than a successful financial venture. Hild works his vineyards responsibly and is on the way toward organic certification.

Here’s what the importer has to say: The fact that Matthias is single-handedly trying to save the old, terraced parcels of Elbling is a move that is equal parts romantic and completely insane. The financial realities of working these vineyards by hand while accepting their lower yields simply do not add up. This is an act of cultural preservation more than anything else. He calls the wine “Zehnkommanull” which means simply 10% — the wine always ferments bone dry and is 10% ABV or less. The few cases that I’m able to get of this wine are, to me at least, semi-sacred voices of a time long past. Sacred voices that end up on the $20-and-under table and most often overlooked.

We’ll pour the 2017 Elbling Trocken and the NV Brut Sekt. These are spirited, zippy, start-the-party wines.

Eva Fricke Rheingau Riesling Trocken 2017

Eva Fricke is not from Rheingau and she is not from a winemaking family. But she went to oenological school, and after finishing her studies she did wine stints in Bordeaux, Piedmont, Ribera del Duero, and Australia. She settled in the lower Rheingau area of Lorch, where she is biodynamically farming steep-sloped, low-yielding plots that were forgotten (or intentionally avoided) by the larger producers because they’re so difficult to work. The vineyards are on loess, clay, slate, and quartzite soils.

This Riesling has the touch of richness that Fricke’s wines tend to exhibit, along with peaches, lime-zest, and mouth-watering, precise minerality. Here’s more on Eva Fricke.

Shiba Wichern Willamette Cuvée Pinot Noir and Havlin Pinot Noir

All notes from Chris: The main goals are balance and elegance. As it turns out a great way to do this is via minimal intervention during ferment and cellaring. On the other hand it requires that we spend a lot of time in the vineyard during the growing season and during harvest for field sorting. One thing that Akiko insists on doing differently from a very big portion of the industry -big or small- is actually work the vineyards ourselves. Our grapes don’t grow in picking bins on flatbed trucks. She refuses to hire a crew to do the field work. Almost every step is done by Akiko, friends & family and me. This gives Akiko such a high level of control and understanding of the grapes, the importance of which should not be under estimated.

Finally, Akiko much like the Japanese cliché, observes, learns and collects what she deems to be the best practices for wine-making. Implementing what she learns is not always easy and sometimes doesn’t work out as we expect, but that is also key to the learning process. Over the past 5 harvests we have worked out a lot of kinks. Give us about 20-25 more years and we might actually admit to knowing what we are doing…

2014 Willamette Cuvée

Our goal with the Willamette Cuvée is to offer an excellent quality Pinot Noir at a very approachable price. At the same time we try to capture a little bit of character from each of our three vineyards and present them as a well-balanced package. Mild red and black fruits from the Havlin Vineyard, smells of summer-forest and black tea from Barrett Hill Vineyard and powerful dark fruits and spices from Eola Springs Vineyard all play well together to make the Willamette Cuvée complex, but not muddled. As the wine breathes the character continues to expand and present more depth.

Food pairings with the Willamette Cuvée are easy, because it goes well with everything. That statement isn’t very useful. So, try it with roasted pork, which is the go-to-meal for Pinot Noir. Try it with Asian food like Korean Barbeque or Japanese Pizza (okonomiyaki). For Sushi, however, it’d be better to stick with our Rosé. You can also drink the Willamette Cuvée with no more accompaniment than the glass you poured it in.

Willamette Cuvée was blended after barrel ageing in 12% new French Oak for a little over 18 months and has been in the bottle since May 1st, 2016. Details about cellaring and grapes can be found in the single vineyard descriptions.

2014 Havlin Vineyard Pinot Noir

Havlin Vineyard is in Perrydale directly in the so-called Van Duzer Corridor, which is known for bringing cold coastal winds to the Willamette Valley in the afternoon and evening. These winds are exactly what Pinot Noir grapes need for balanced ripening, in other words developing sugar and flavor while retaining acidity. We made 137 cases of Havlin, which is 5 and one half barrels.

The 2014 Havlin retains a lot of its Havlin-ness (strong black and red fruits), but is at the same time very different from the 2013. In 2013 Havlin was our burliest wine –in as much as our wines are ever “burly.” In 2014 Havlin is feminine, subtle and almost delicate, but It still shows the very punchy red fruit that we had in 2013. And the red fruit still evolves with time into the typical Oregon Pinot Noir black fruit and lavender, but now the amplitude of the fruit is more balanced with the tartness and other non-fruit tones.

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM

October 5, 2018

~notes from Wine Traditions

Domaine des XIII Lunes Vin de Savoie Apremont 2017

Winemaker Sylvain Liotard has been farming a little village in the alps at the foot of Mont Granier since 2014. He is dedicated to biodynamic farming practices, using buried composts and silica, plant based tinctures, closely guarding the health of the soils, keeping use of copper to a minimum. He practices minimal intervention during vinification, with indigenous yeast and very small amounts of sulfur at bottling. Sylvain has been certified organic and Demeter certified for 2 years.

Domaine de XIII Lunes produce 6 cuvées, 4 white and 2 red, from local indigenous grape varieties. The white grapes are Jacquere, Altesse, Velteliner, red grapes are Mondeuse, Gamay.

Savoie consists of many isolated sub-regions and plots of vineyards scattered across four French departments: Savoie, Haute-Savoie, Isère, Ain. Savoie neighbors Switzerland (to the East), the Jura region (to the North) and the little-known Bugey region, which is west across the Rhône river. All told, the region is under 5,000 acres (2000 ha) accounting for a mere 0.5% of French wines. 70% of the wine produced in Savoie is white.

The Domaine des XIII Lunes Vin de Savoie Apremont 2017 is made of 100% Jacquere grown on clay and limestone within the Savoie sub-appellation Apremont. It is a lovely, high-toned wine, with good acidity, deliciously fresh and fruity with refreshingly low alcohol at 10.5%.

Domaine du Crêt de Bine “Cuvée Bio’Addict” 2017 Beaujolais

François and Marie-Therèse Subrin farm 5 hectares of land in the village of Sarcy, a village situated on a high plateau tucked between the Monts Beaujolais and the Monts Lyonnais in the southwest corner of the Beaujolais appellation. The Subrin’s vineyard is planted on granite soils with significant deposits of quartz and feldspar. On average, the vines are 40 years old. François and Marie-Therèse farm organically and biodynamically. To insure maximum health and ripeness for their grapes, they severely limit the yields and harvest late into the growing season.

Cuvée Bio’Addict” is from hand-harvested grapes that are partially de-stemmed and fermented with indigenous yeast at low temperatures. NO SO2 is used in the fermenting process, and only a dash is used at bottling–less than 20mg. This is a smooth and spicy Beaujolais, accented with red fruit and stones.

Château Les Vieux Moulins “Pirouette” Cote de Blaye 2017

Château Les Vieux Moulins is the property of Damien Lorteau. He took over in 2010 from his parents and grandparents. He inherited 20 hectares, 11 in the village of Reignac and 9 in the village of Anglade. In acknowledging the difference between the terroirs, Damien produces two wines, one from each village. His vineyards are certified organic and Damien has increased the density in his vineyards so that nearly all the parcels have 7,000 plants per hectare. His winemaking philosophy is non-interventional. He allows the indigenous yeasts to ferment the juice and uses very little SO2 throughout the process. Fermentations are carried out in small cement tanks and Damien avoids both pump overs and moving the wine by pump after fermentation. The labels were designed by a Swedish artist named Madlen Herrstrom.

The Pirouette cuvee is produced from eight parcels in the village of Reignac, mostly in the lieu-dit Freneau. The largest parcels sit on the summit of a small hill and benefit from frequent wind which certainly helps with organic farming. The soils range from a sandy clay (80%) which is planted to Merlot, to a sandy gravel ( 20%) which is planted with Cabernet Sauvignon. After harvest the grapes are destemmed and then put in a tank for three to five days at a low temperature to have a pre-fermentation maceration. The fermentation and extended maceration lasts typically 20 days and an assemblage is made from the different tanks before the malo-lactic fermentation. The wine is matured in cement tanks for 12 months before bottling.

Domaine de Clovallon “Les Indigènes” 2016

The Orb River runs for 135 kilometers from the Larzac Causses in Haut-Languedoc down to the Mediterranean Sea. Domaine de Clovallon is situated in the Haute Vallée de L’Orb which refers to a small stretch of the river valley that runs east to west with exposed hillsides and excellent southern exposure. Spanning geological periods from the primary to the quartenary, the Haute Vallée de L’Orb contains virtually every soil type found in France, and many of them are present in Clovallon’s 10 hectares.

To be in the company of Catherine Roque and her daughter Alix, is to be in the company of and feel the energy of passionate farmers. Catherine says that seeing the results of her bio-dynamic farming practices has greatly inspired her. In the vineyard, the Roques use fertilizer from their neighbor’s cows along with a mix of valerian and dolomite. In between the rows, the natural grasses are left to grow and Alix is contemplating buying a few sheep to help with the “mowing”. They already employ the help of their chickens. As non-interventionist winemakers, their wines naturally convey their respect for and delight in their land and vineyards.

The cuvee “Les Indigènes” is produced from a single “clos” of less than a hectare that was planted around two hundred years ago and retains pre-phylloxera vines. As was the custom “back in the day” the vineyard was co-planted with a wide variety of grape types both white and red. Most of the grapes have been identified and include Carignan, Cinsault, Clairette, Grenache, Grenache Blanc. Grenache Gris, Macabeu, Malvasia, Muscat a Petits Grains, Ugni Blanc, Aramon, Terret, and Jacquet. The clos itself sits high above the town of Bedarieux and is accessible only by a narrow lane that winds its way up from the town to the vineyard at the top of the hill. It is hidden from the eye because it is both walled and shielded by fruit trees.

To gain entrance to the small vineyard one has to pass through an entrance gate and then a bit further on pass through a doorway framed by a stone arch giving the whole experience a “secret garden” quality.

All varieties are co-fermented in old oak foudres using indigenous yeasts and without temperature control. The wine is unfiltered and unfined.

Wine Tasting in the Shop

Friday August 24, 2018

La Boutanche Blanc (Martin Texier) Vin de France, 2015

La Boutanche is a natural wine project started by importer Selection Massale to address the issue of the shortage of natural wines in the $20-and-under price range. These liter-size, screw-top, glou glou wines are from different producers within the Selection Massale portfolio.

Martin Texier is the son of well-known natural winemaker Eric Texier. Martin was studying economics before deciding that perhaps he oughta follow in his father’s footsteps. In between he was also a DJ, and worked in a couple NYC wine shops and a record shop. Now he has five hectares in the Rhone in St.-Julien-en-St.-Alban, planted to traditional red and white Rhone varieties. This white is just one of his Boutanche offerings.

Tiberi “Il Musticco” 2017, Umbria

Tiberi is a small family winery in Umbria, at the heart of Italy. Before 2012 the family used to sell their grapes to other winemakers. Since then they’ve been making their own wines with the help of the godfather of Italian natural wine, Danilo Marcucci. Siblings Frederico and Beatrice Tiberi are fourth-generation winemakers, working vines planted in the ’70s. They do all the good things: organic farming, hand-harvesting, little intervention, no additives or sulfur, etc. Their Il Musticco is a blend of Gamay de Trasimeno (aka Grenache) and Ciliegiolo, bottled and capped before fermentation is finished, giving it a lively effervescence. It’s the color of pomegranate berries, with tart cherries on the nose and palate, balanced by a crisp minerality and a long dry finish.

Envínate

Here’s a blurb from the importer: Envínate (Wine Yourself) is the brainchild of 4 friends, winemakers Roberto Santana, Alfonso Torrente, Laura Ramos, and José Martínez. This gang of 4 formed back in 2005 while studying enology at the University of Miguel Hernandez in Alicante. Upon graduation, they formed a winemaking consultancy, which evolved into Envínate, a project that focuses on exploring distinctive parcels mainly in the Atlantic-inflected regions of Ribeira Sacra and the Canary Islands. Their collective aim is to make profoundly pure and authentic wines that express the terruño of each parcel in a clear and concise manner. To this end, no chemicals are used in any of the Envínate vineyards, all parcels are picked by hand, the grapes are foot-trodden, and the wines are fermented exclusively with wild yeasts, with a varying proportion of whole grape clusters included. For aging, the wines are raised in old barrels and sulfur is only added at bottling, if needed. The results are some of the most exciting and honest wines being produced in Spain today.

Envínate Benje Tinto 2017

Benje is sourced from several plots of 70 to 105 year old vines (95% Listan Prieto, 5% Tintilla) grown at 1,000-1,200 meters elevation on Tenerife, the largest of the seven Canary Islands. The vineyards are situated high on the northwestern volcanic slopes in and around Santiago del Teide, and are tended by Emilio Ramírez & Envínate. The climate is mild but winds from the Atlantic and Africa, coupled with fluctuations in humidity, present some challenges.

Each parcel is harvested by hand then vinified separately, with some going into concrete, some in small open tubs. They then go together into neutral french oak for malolactic fermentation, then are raised in the same barrels for 8 months without lees stirring or added SO2. It’s bottled unfiltered and clarified using only natural vegetable proteins.

This is high-elevation, volcanic deliciousness. The red fruit and zesty acidity combined with earthy, floral, herbal notes make it pair perfectly with grilled meats, but it can do well with some seafood too and vegetables, especially dishes that utilize smoky paprika. It can handle a bit of peppery heat too.

Envínate Albahra Vinos Mediterraneos 2017

Albahra is named for the vineyard location, and means “small sea”. It comes from a single vineyard that’s divided into 3 parcels at 800 meters elevation in the Almansa region, around the town of Albacete. Almansa is located at the southeastern tip of Castilla-LaMancha, about a four hour drive east of Madrid (and quite a hike from Tenerife). This is 100% Garnacha Tintorera from 30 year old vines. This grape is also known as Alicante Bouschet, and is a hybrid of Garnacha and Petit Bouschet. Unlike most red grapes, the juice of Garnacha Tintorera is dark (that’s what the tintorera indicates) so the wine is dark too, and in this case, soft and spicy. Albahra is fermented 50% whole-cluster in cement vats, then aged for 8 months in the same vats. It’s another versatile food wine, that can also pair well with seafood, as well as with tomatoes, olives, manchego cheese, gazpacho, fennel (raw or roasted), and a host of other mediterranean influenced fare.

Wine Tasting in the Shop

Friday August 3, 2018

We got a small drop of new Louis/Dressner and we’re tasting some of it tonight. We also got a tiny amount of 1996 Peter Lauer Saar Riesling Sekt (not Dressner) disgorged in May of this year. This Champagne method bubbly is left on the lees for over 20 years, is hand-riddled and disgorged, and is pretty special. Read more about Lauer here. We also got some 2013 Sekt, if you can’t get enough fizzy Lauer. Here’s the tasting line-up:

Immich-Batterieberg Detonation Riesling 2016 Mosel, Germany

This is one of Mosel’s oldest estates, established in 911 by a Carolingian monastery, which the Immich family took over in the 1400s. Sometime during the 1800s, Carl August Immich wanted to expand into the barren hillside. So doing what people do, he blasted it with a cannon. It took 5 years, but finally the terraced “Batterieberg” (“Battered Mountain”) vineyard was born, and the estate gained its current name: Immich-Batterieberg. Sadly in 1989 the property was sold off and the winery’s traditional approach was abandoned for a modern style. Almost 20 years later, in 2007, Immich-Batterieberg filed for bankruptcy. But! Cue the trumpets: Bahmp Bah Baaahhh! Enter Gernot Kollmann (and two investors) in 2009, who restored the estate to its former glory. Gernot’s winemaking emphasizes terroir, utilizes little to no manipulation, and focuses on dry riesling. 2016 is the first vintage of Detonation and is an homage to Carl August Immich. While some of the fruit is from estate vineyards, more is handpicked and purchased from steep, sustainably farmed growing sites around the towns of Drohn and Oberemmeler. In the winery the grapes ferment via indigenous yeast and age on the lees in large neutral oak casks, and a little bit of stainless steel, and the wine is bottled with very little sulfur. Terry Thiese says “2016 does not appear to have a dark side…it is almost never not delicious, almost never ungainly, unbalanced or unappealing. I can hardly remember a more adorable vintage.” We’re down with that.

Éric Texier “Adele” Cotes du Rhone Blanc, 2017, France

Éric Texier came to wine without any family connection or romantic, multi-generational story. In 1992, after years as a nuclear scientist, he opted to follow his passion for wine and formally study viticulture and oenology at Bordeaux University. He read a lot, visited winemakers around the world, and worked in Burgundy with Jean-Marie Guffens, at Verget. There he learned the benefits of minimal-intervention wine-making: native yeasts, little to no herbicides, no machines, etc…

As a beginner, he was unable to afford his own vineyards, so he became a négociant, buying only from small growers philosophically aligned with himself. He has since acquired plots in Côte Rôtie and Condrieu in the northern Rhône, and replanted several hectares in long-forgotten Brézème with Syrah and Roussanne. All of his wines are aged in the underground 16th-century cellar at his home in Charnay-en-Beaujolais.

Adele is mostly Clairette with the remainder Marsanne, fermented in cement tanks with native yeasts. It rests for about 8 months on its lees, without sulfur, and is bottled unfiltered and unfined, with very little sulfur at bottling.

La Stoppa Trebbiolo Rosso 2016, Emilia-Romagna

La Stoppa is a 50 hectare property founded in the late 19th century by a lawyer named Gian-Marco Ageno. Of the 50 hectares, about 30 are planted to vines, and the rest is forest (and the remains of a medieval tower). In 1973, with no winemaking or growing exerience, Elena Pantaleoni’s father purchased the property. In 1991 Elena joined her father in working the estate, and at that same time began farming organically (they were certified in 2008). The previous owner had planted non-native varieties like Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Tokay, Pinot Gris, Grechetto, and Pinot Noir which were not suited to the soils or the climate of the region; it wasn’t until 1996 that these were ripped up and replanted with Bonarda, Barbera, and Malvasia.

Elena Pantaleoni now works with winemaker Giulio Armani to make minimal intervention, real wines true to place and grape. Fermentation is with native yeast with no added sulfur, skin-contact is lengthy, and the wines are bottled unfiltered and unfined. Fermentations and aging take place in stainless steel (for entry level wines like this Trebbiolo), concrete, and Slavonian and French oak barrels (not new). Elena has chosen to use IGT classification instead of DOC so that she has freedom to work around the regulations regarding varieties, geography, and production techniques.

Trebbiolo Rosso is Barbera and Bonarda (AKA: Croatina, NOT Bonarda Piemontese, or the Bonarda from Argentina) from younger vines of 5-20 years that grow on heavy clay soils. The grapes are destemmed and fermented on the skins for 20 days in stainless steel, and further aged in stainless. The name Trebbiolo comes from the nearby river and valley known as Trebbia. This wine is lovely and lively, with fresh red berries and ripe cherries throughout.

Éric Texier A.O.C Côtes du Rhône “Brézème” Red 2016

-see producer note above.

100% Syrah from 25 year old vines on rocky southwest facing slopes of clay and limestone. It’s vinified whole cluster and aged for 15 months in concrete vats. This wine is lush and full with notes of cocoa, black cherries, brambly earth, and dashes of citrus.