Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM

June 28, 2019

Peter Buckley from Vineyard Road pouring.

Domaine des Cognettes Clisson Muscadet 2013

The village of Clisson is a mini-appellation within Muscadet Sevre et Maine. The vines (in this case over 60 years old) grow on poor, hard, compact granite with little clay, and a lot of quartz and mica over hard granite.

Brothers Stephane and Vincent Perraud work organically on their small property, as well as patiently. This Muscadet (100% Melon de Bourgogne) is pressed in whole bunches, fermented with native yeasts and very low SO2, with fermentation and aging in underground vats for 44 months. May need decanting…

Domaine Pattes Loup, Burgundy

Notes from the importer: Domaine Pattes Loup is one of the most exciting estates to emerge from Chablis in recent years (Pattes Loup means “wolf’s paws”). Thomas Pico started his tiny estate in Courgis in 2005, just outside of Chablis, under the wing of his friends and fellow organic Chablisiens, Alice and Olivier de Moor. He inherited 2.4 hectares of vines from his family’s estate that had been producing correct, but uninspiring wines. Fortunately, most of his vines were planted by his grandfather in selection massale in the hillsides near Courgis and Preys, the two highest altitude villages within Chablis, with vineyards up to 300 meters. Motivated to take a qualitative leap in a new direction, and against the wishes of his father, he immediately began a program of strict yield control and a conversion to Organic Viticulture—a rarity in Chablis, and a feat of extreme diligence in this often inhospitable vine growing region.

Thomas Pico Blanc, Vin de France 2017

Pico Blanc is Chardonnay, Gros Manseng, and Clairette from organically farmed vineyards, fermented in stainless steel. It’s a touch creamy, with orchard fruits throughout, and fresh acidity on the finish.

Chablis Vent d’Ange 2017

Importer notes: From vines averaging 55 years old mostly selection massale plantings by Pico’s grandfather around the villages Courgis and Preys, south-west of central Chablis. Vineyards are approximately 300 meters high making these two of Chablis highest altitude villages. All vineyard work is done by hand. Yields are kept small at the domaine, approximately 28 hectoliters per hectare.

Pico uses a “champagne press” at the domaine to allow for a very slow and delicate press of the grapes. All juice moves downstairs to the vinification settling room by gravity through a drain at the bottle of the press. All wines are fermented using only indigenous yeasts and élevage is slow and long lasting up to 14 months. A combination of stainless steel and cement eggs are used for the Chablis Vent d’Ange. The juice is racked and blended and will be blended again before bottling. Each parcel is vinified separately and blended after one year of fermentation. Bottled without fining and filtration. It’s aged for 14 months on the lees in a combination of stainless steel, cement egg, and used barrique.

Elisabetta Foradori, Ampeleia Unlitro 2018, IGT Costa Toscana

Elisabetta took over the grape growing and winemaking duties at the family estate in Trentino, Italy, when her father died young in 1985. Since then she has transformed the estate from the ground up, converting to biodynamic viticulture and bringing the region back to valuing quality over quantity.

Ampeleia is a joint venture from Elisabetta and a few friends. Unlitro is a liter of glou-glou. It’s mostly Alicante (Grenache) and some Carignan and Alicante Bouschet from vineyard planted at 200-250 meters above sea level, then fermented and aged for 6 months in cement. Organic, very low SO2. Put a little chill on it, toss it back.

Domaine Guiberteau Saumur Rouge 2018

Importer notes: Romain Guiberteau is the third generation on the estate, and things have changed radically since he took over. Romain’s grandfather was a pillar in the community of Saumur before and after World War II, long serving as the head of the local growers’ coop. That coop long benefited from the grapes grown on Guiberteau’s land until Romain returned from college.

Today, Romain oversees the organic farm and does all the winemaking at the estate. His vines date back to the years just after World War II and include some of the prime sites in and around Saumur. Romain’s father Robert, a medical doctor, assisted in the transformation of the estate and you are likely to meet him at a tasting, explaining the history of the wines and the vines his mother and father planted.

Cabernet Franc from 3 parcels of over 60 year old vines grown on limestone. 100% de-stemmed, indigenous yeast fermentation. Aged for 6 months in tank.

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM

All organic French wines with Vineyard Road.

April 26, 2019

Domaine de l’enclos Chablis, Burgundy 2017

Domaine de l’enclos is a 29 hectare property (partly certified organic, and in conversion) run by brothers Romain and Damien Bouchard. Romain and Damien grew up working in the cellar with their father, Pascal Bouchard. In 2005 they bought the tiny, defunct Domaine de la Grande Chaume, and started making certified, organic Chablis in a small corner of their father’s cellar. Roughly 10 years later Pascal sold his winery, passing along the proceeds of the sale to his two sons, who then had to find a new winery and equipment. Two years later they purchased this property. The average vine age is 30 years old, with some over 50 years old. 

The estate is located in the heart of Chablis and was once the home of monks from the Abby of Pontigny. There’s a large building built in the 1800s, and a new cellar, partly underground, built in 2016. 2016 was in fact the first vintage vinified here, in the new gravity fed cellar, released in 2018. The property employs 12 people year-round, which doubles at harvest. All fermentation is in stainless steel with indigenous yeast, with finishing is in stainless and french oak of varying age. There’s minimal sulfur additions at pressing and bottling.

This Chablis is from Chardonnay vines planted between 1975 and 2005 on soils of clay and limestone. It’s citrus and mineral driven, with beautiful texture and floral notes throughout.  

Les Terres Blanches BB Rosé 2018

This is a small property in Anjou run by husband and wife Benoit and Celine Blet. The couple took over the farm from Bernard Coutel in 2004, became certified organic in 2010, and now work biodynamically / naturally. The domaine is 8.5 hectares of densely planted vines on quartz and clay. This rosé is all Gamay, grown on sandstone, fermented with wild yeast, and a miniscule touch of sulfur at bottling only. This wine, while technically “natural” is not funky. It’s clean, dry, stony, delicate (elegant even, despite the picnic table label), mineral-driven, and refreshing. When it’s allowed to warm up just a bit, the texture fleshes out and softer, riper fruit emerges. It’s a pretty wine. 

Domaine D’Ouréa, Tire Bouchon, Rhone 2015

In 2010, after apprenticing at Domaine Romanée Conti in Burgundy, and Turley Wine Cellars in California (not too shabby of a resumé there!), Adrien Roustan, then 24, took over 9 hectares from his father who grew and sold grapes to the local co-op. The property is now 15 hectares of Vacqueyras and high-elevation Gigondas plots (at 400 meters to 520 meters, they are the highest elevation vines in the appellation, and the yields are tiny). Farming is certified organic.  

The Tire Bouchon is a unique blend of mostly Grenache, with a balance of Carignan, Syrah, and two ancient, unauthorized varieties, Aramon Noir and Oeillade Noire, planted by Adrien’s grandfather. The vines are all within Vaucluse, but  the inclusion of Aramon and Oeillade mean that the wine can’t use the appellation designation and must be labeled Vin de France. All the fruit is de-stemmed and fermented with indigenous yeast in cement vats, and then aged for 6 more months in cement. It’s bottled unfiltered. It’s a lively, perfumed, and youthful red, loaded with fresh fruit and hillside herbs. It’s a steal at under 15 bucks. 

Domaine Heitz-Lochardet Connivence (Armand Heitz + Alex Foillard), Coteaux Bourguignons 2017

Domaine Heitz-Lochardet was established in 1857 by the Nie-Vantey family, owners of many vineyards from Santenay to Clos de Vougeot. After the phylloxera epidemic many of the vineyards were sold, but Georges Lochardet, a wine merchant, kept some of the best Cote de Beaune vineyards in the family. The estate was around 20ha when he passed away, and left half of the vineyards to his son Armand Lochardet, who went on to have three children – Bernard, Catherine and Brigitte – amongst whom the vineyards were further divided. In 1983 Brigitte married Christian Heitz, and together they founded Heitz-Lochardet, which they farmed organically, in Chassagne-Montrachet, Chevalier-Montrachet Grand Cru, Meursault, Pommard and Volnay. Additionally there is a small amount of Bourgogne Rouge and Blanc. For roughly 25 years, the vineyards were fully contracted to Joseph Drouhin.

In 2011, Brigitte and Christian’s son Armand returned after studying oenology, took over operation of the domaine, and began converting the property to fully biodynamic practices. He was guided by consulting oenologist Ludovic Pierrot, who had himself spent eight years at Domaine Leflaive working alongside Anne-Claude Leflaive, a pioneer in biodynamic farming in Burgundy. 2013 was their first vintage. All of the wines are fermented whole cluster, as Armand believes that a wine’s essence is “derived from the totality of the vine. Each component of the vine, from roots to leaves to stems, skins and pulp, plays an important role in a living wine.”

Each year Armand makes a wine with a good friend, as a joint-venture. 2017 it was Connivence, a 50/50 blend of Pinot Noir and Gamay, that Armand made with Alex Foillard, son of Jean, of Beaujolais fame. This is a lovely, fresh & light red, full of charm and vibrant fruit.