Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM

March 22, 2019

Pearl Morissette Chardonnay “Cuvée Dix Neuvième” 2013, Ontario, Canada

This Chardonnay is from the 19th Street Vineyard, planted in 1999, in Ontario’s Twenty Mile Bench appellation. The vines are planted on loam over limestone and the wine was was fermented and raised with very low SO2 in a combination of cement egg, demi-muid, and new-barrique. 

Here’s an excerpt from an Eric Asimov piece on the producer last year in the NYT: 

Mr. Morissette, whose wines are both idiosyncratic and remarkable, never imagined he would be making wine on the Niagara Peninsula. He grew up south of Montreal, “in one of the worst places in the world, a suburb,” he said. His family did not drink wine, but he was inspired by novels and old French movies in which joyful, witty scenes set around meals always seemed to include wine.

After traveling around Europe and spending several years in New York, he returned to Montreal, where he learned to be a sommelier at Laloux, a longtime bistro with an excellent wine list. There he was introduced to the Beaujolais of Marcel Lapierre, the Sancerres of Vatan and Cotat, the Cornas of Clape and the Hermitage of Chave.

“I call these wines my liquid mentors,” he said.

Tired of restaurants, he found work in Burgundy with Frédéric Mugnier at Domaine Jacques-Frédéric Mugnier, known best for its ethereal Chambolle-Musignys, just as Mr. Mugnier was taking charge full time. He also worked with Christian Gouges of Domaine Henri Gouges, which makes austere, long-lived Nuits-St.-Georges.

Read the whole article here.

Charles Joguet Chinon Rosé 2018, Loire, France

Charles Joguet left his life as an artist and sculptor to take over his family’s domain in 1957. Until then, all the grapes were sold to negociants; Charles ended this practice, and dedicated himself to producing single vineyard bottlings from what he knew would be considered premier cru and grand cru vineyards in other regions. He made a name for himself and became one of the most highly regarded producers in the region. 

Today Kevin Fontaine is the producer, closely following Charles’ path and philosophies. He still vinifies plots separately, and farming is organic. This rosé is 100% Cabernet Franc from roughly 30 year-old vines planted on sandy soil. It’s fermented in stainless steel and does not undergo malolactic fermentation, in order to retain the freshness of the fruit. It just came in, and we haven’t even tasted it yet, so we’ll open it up together and see what it’s got! 

Château La Hase Bordeaux 2016

Owned by Jean-Yves Millaire, this is a one hectare property planted to mostly Merlot (60%), then the rest Cab Franc and Cab Sauvignon. Farming is organic, and weeding is by horse and plow. All the grapes are hand-harvested, and this wine is fermented and aged in French oak for 10 months. 

This is a satisfying and inexpensive everyday Bordeaux. It’s medium-bodied, a touch earthy and smoky, dark-fruit and iron flecked, and a little bit of tannins on the finish. 

Heinrich RED 2015, Neusiedlersee, Austria

Gernot and Heike Heinrich founded their winery in 1990 with just one hectare, steadily growing to the 90 they have today. They farm biodynamically, and were certified (via Respekt) in 2006.

All the wines here are fermented spontaneously and often left on the skins for several weeks, followed by extended time on the lees, usually in neutral oak casks. Gernot says, “we give the wines plenty of time to mature, the time that hardly anyone has today; it is above all else time that shapes our wines.”

RED is their entry level wine and is a soft, fruity blend of Zweigelt, Blaufränkisch, and St. Laurent that’s aged for 12 months in 500 litre oak casks. It pairs nicely with roast chicken, eggs and veggies with paprika, earthy mushrooms….

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM

March 1, 2019

Patricia Green Cellars, Willamette Valley, Oregon

Patricia Green Cellars is located on a 52 acre estate in the Ribbon Ridge Appellation of the Willamette Valley. It was purchased in 2000 by Patty Green and Jim Anderson, a duo with over 50 years combined winemaking experience, with the intention of assembling “the strongest collection of well-farmed, high-quality sites with great reputations in the entire state”. Emphasis here is on a broad selection of vineyard designated Pinot Noir from across Ribbon Ridge, Dundee Hills, and the Chehalem Mountain appellations, as well as some experiments in Sauvignon Blanc, and the dry Muscats we’ll be tasting. Unfortunately Patty passed away unexpectedly in 2017, so Jim Anderson, a Maine native, is now sole proprietor. He’s also the winemaker, along with Matthew Russell, who joined the winery in 2007.

From the winery: “Patty wanted to make things naturally. That is not to say that we make natural wines or are seen in any way as a natural wine winery even though we probably operate in a way that would easily include us in that spectrum (for whatever that is worth). She felt that from the right sites everything was already available to make wines that were interesting, unique and soulful. She wasn’t a technocrat on wines and never felt like math and science were the answers to getting from fruit to wine. They helped in the process but you needed to enter with a feeling for the vineyard so that you could allow that expression to be revealed in the resulting wine. If you go in with the idea that you know how to “make” the wine or even really have a conception of what you want that wine to be like stylistically then you aren’t going about things the correct way to begin with.”

Dry Muscat Ottonel, Oak Grove Vineyard 2016

Winemaker’s notes: Muscat Ottonel is a white wine grape variety that is a member of the Muscat family. It is most notable for its use in dessert wines from Austria, Romania, Croatia and Serbia as well as dry wines from Alsace and Hungary. We have produced this exotic varietal in a bone-dry style showcasing its elegance and fragrance of pear blossoms and white flowers. This is generally a lower acid grape and while it is far from high in acid it has a nice lift and snap to it that makes for a refreshing, almost thirst-quenching sort of beverage.

Dry Muscat Ottonel “Marie” 2016

This is another dry muscat, but this time fermented on the skins and aged in concrete. As the label implies, it’s like a rock wrapped in orange peels. It’s low-alcohol, but not sweet. It’s mineral-driven, flowery, unique, and intriguing… Marie was Patty’s middle name, and this wine is a tribute to her.

Weingut Beurer, Rot Trocken 2017, Württemberg, Germany

The Beurer family has farmed land just outside of Stuttgart for generations, growing grapes and making wine that ended up in local co-op productions. In 1997, Jochen Beurer, his wife Marion, and father Sigfried struck out on their own, making and bottling wine for themselves––the first two years were out of a garage. In 2003 Jochen started experimenting with organic viticulture and spontaneous fermentation. Over the next few years he converted to fully biodynamic farming and natural winemaking. Relying upon spontaneous fermentation means that Jochen is usually the last to pick his grapes in cooler years. His wines take their time, and decide what to do and when, and usually include malolactic. Often fermentations are still ongoing in February or March, having gone dormant during the winter, and waking up again in spring. We brought in four of these wines (Riesling, Weiss, Trollinger, and this Rot Trocken) and they are all singularly delicious.

Rot Trocken is a blend of Spätburgunder, Cabernet Dorio, Dornfelder, and Portugieser vinified separately then aged in small oak barrels for seven months. It’s another low abv, at just 11%, but it’s got so much character: dark, spicy fruit, soft & velvety texture, long & savory finish. It’s a bottle you’ll slurp down too quick if you’re not paying attention!

Broadside Cabernet Sauvignon 2016, Paso Robles, CA

From the producer: Broadside produces wines focused on purity and true varietal expression. We favor balance and simplicity, giving consumers a window to the promise of the central coast and varietal character. Our winemaking employs a natural approach in that our wines are minimally handled to best express the grape, site and vintage. We harvest at lower sugars and use little to no new oak to create wines of balance and finesse that make sense on the dinner table.

Founder/viticulturist Stephanie Terrizzi holds degrees in enology, chemistry, and Plant science. Stephanie manages vineyard operations and is a prominent force for bio-organic viticulture in Paso Robles and the central coast, recently nominated for winegrape grower of the year in San Luis Obispo County.

Founder/winemaker Brian Terrizzi made wine in Italy for several years, then in Sonoma, and Santa Barbara County. Brian and Stephanie settled in Paso Robles to start their own production. Along with the Italian-inspired wines under their Giornata label (also in Paso Robles), Brian approaches winemaking at Broadside with a minimalist, refined touch.

The grapes are from Paso Robles Santa Margartia Ranch, Estrella, and San Juan District AVAs. 2016 brought near-normal precipitation for the first time in years, following a substantial drought throughout California. Healthy soils and reinvigorated vines produced a balanced crop of flavorful fruit across all of our vineyard sources. The 2016 Paso Robles Cabernet Sauvignon highlights the strong vintage with plenty of dark berry-focused fruit, earthy notes and toasty mocha/caramel oak.

Domaine de Piaugier Gigondas 2014

Jean-Marc Autran, took over the winery from his father Marc in 1985, who had previously inherited it from his father, Alphonse. Jean-Marc acquired more vineyards and, with the assistance of his wife Sophie, developed the sale of his wines in bottle. The winery soon became too small and they extended it in 1995 to enable them to mature and store the wines in the best possible conditions. Today, Sophie and Jean-Marc cultivate 3.5 hectares within the Gigondas AOC, 12.5 hectares in the Sablet AOC and 14 hectares of Côtes du Rhône vineyards. Farming is organic.

Only about 250 cases were made of this wine, and we grabbed what was left in RI––just under a case and a half. 2014 was a difficult year that demanded a lot of attention and selection from growers. The cool summer resulted in some under-ripe Grenache in some vineyards, and rain in September led to botrytis elsewhere. While this Gigondas had the challenge of being from grapes grown in vineyards on the cooler side of the Dentelles de Montmirail, the wine itself is a beauty, which is a testament to the skill of the producer. It’s a blend of mostly Grenache, followed by Mourvedre, then Syrah, from 40-45 year old vines planted on limestone, clay, and sand. The grapes were hand-harvested and vinified with natural yeast in oak, then aged in a combo of foudres and barrels. It’s an elegant wine, not all about power (like the ripe 2015s) but instead about structure, finesse, texture, and terroir. It’s in a beautiful spot right now, and while it still has time to develop, it’s one to drink sooner rather than a decade from now. We love it.

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Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5pm-8pm

February 8, 2019

Peter from Vineyard Road pours this tasty selection…and perhaps a surprise or two…

German Gilabert Cava Brut Nature, Catalonia, Spain

German Gilabert Cava is part of a José Pastor project called Vinos de Terruños, which was established in 2003 with a philosophy of bringing to market handmade wines of native Spanish varieties, from old, organic, and sustainable vineyards and authentic Spanish wine terroirs. They are usually very reasonably priced.

The grapes used for German Gilabert come from the subzone Alt Penedès, where the highest elevation plots are located. Only native grapes are used (in this case Macabeo and Parellada) and the wine is bottled without added sugar, or Brut Nature. It’s left on the lees for 18 to 20 months before disgorgement.

It’s medium-bodied with tiny bubbles and a citrus-driven character. The finish is dry and elegant. Have it with salty Spanish food.

Angelo Negro & Figli, Roero Arneis Unfiltered 2017, Piedmont, Italy

Importers notes: Since 1670 the Negro family has cultivated vineyards in the Roero hills (northwest of Alba), working to increase the value of this wonderful corner of Piemonte and dedicating wines to the prestigious native vines: Favorita, Arneis, Nebbiolo, Barbera, Bonarda, Dolcetto and Brachetto. Today the estate is run by Giovanni Negro and his family. With some of the best vineyard sites in Roero, Angelo Negro is one of the indisputable legends of the region. Giovanni Negro, the estate’s present owner, produced the first dry Arneis on record in 1971.

This unfiltered Arneis is from 20 year old vines grown on sandy soils at altitudes of 280-320 meters above sea level. The grapes are hand-harvested, macerated for 24 hours, then fermented (no malo) and aged for 6 months in stainless steel, on the lees. The wine is bottled with just a dash of sulfur, and is a unique expression of Arneis. It’s lightly peachy & grapefruity, with a touch of sour apple, and a leesy, mineral-driven finish.

Ampeleia Kepos 2017, Tuscany, Italy

Ampeleia is a joint Tuscan venture by Alto Adige’s Elisabetta Foradori (known for putting Toraldego on the map) and friends Giovanni Podini and Thomas Widmann. Ampeleia is a total of 150 hectares in Maremma, 40 of which are planted with vines at altitudes of 200-600 m above sea level. Farming is biodynamic and wines are made with minimal intervention.

Kepos is a blend of Grenache, Carignano, and Alicante Bouschet from vineyards closest to the sea. The grapes were hand-harvested from mid-September to early October, then fermented and aged in cement for 11 months. It’s medium-weight, precise, dried-herb-scented, floral, complex, and well-structured.

Luigi Giordano Langhe Rosso 2017, Piedmont, Italy

Distributor’s notes: A stone’s throw from Barbaresco’s village centre among the hills that frame the Tanaro River’s sinuous course, at the very heart of Piedmont’s wine country, the winery and its vineyards were founded by Giovanni Giordano in the 1930s during a time of profound crisis in the Italian wine world. After a period of growing and selling grapes, Giovanni’s son, Luigi, made the bold decision to vinify his own grapes in 1960. Luigi Giordano is now a fourth-generation winery whose vineyards are planted in some of Barbaresco’s most prestigious crus, including Asili and Montestefano. One particular Barbaresco bottling from the cru of Cavanna showcases the winery’s elegant, hands-off style of winemaking and currently represents the only single-vineyard cru of its kind on the market. Since 2000, Luigi has been aided in the running of the winery by two of his daughters, Laura and Silvia – both of whom are as passionate about wine making as their dad and grandad before them.

Langhe Rosso is Nebbiolo and Arneis from vineyards situated within the Barbaresco zone. After fermentation the wine ages for 3-4 months in oak casks. It’s full-bodied and balanced, lightly spicy and full of cherries, dried plums, and dried flowers.

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM

February 1, 2019

Monteversa Primaversa 2015, Veneto

Filippo Voltazza runs his small family vineyard in the Euganean Hills, just west of Venice. Vineyards here are packed into terraced rows, at heights up to 600 meters. Filippo’s family used to sell their grapes to local wineries, to be used in their best bottlings, until they took back all their vines in 2006. Now their 17 hectares face in all four directions to maximize exposure. The vines are densely planted to 4,000 per hectare on chalky-clay volcanic soil. Farming is organic, harvesting is by hand, and most of the wine is fermented and aged in cement, then bottled unfiltered and unfined. 

Primaversa is a gently fizzy pet-nat of Moscato Giallo fermented in stainless steel. It’s dry and herbal, a bit honeyed and nutty.  

Cantina Marilina & Federica Paternò Sikele Bianco and Sikele Rosso, Sicily, Italy

Angelo Paternò worked for 25 years as the winemaker and technical director for the Sicilian wineries Cantine Settesoli and Duca di Salaparuta before purchasing 60 hectares of his own on a hill in the southeastern Sicilian province of Siracusa. He thought this land represented one of the best viticultural areas in Sicily.

Angelo’s daughters Marilina and Federica are now in charge of the property, although Angelo still helps in the cellar. They grow organically and favor minimal intervention and no additives in the winemaking process. They are influenced by local natural winemaker Frank Cornelissen. 35 hectares of their vineyards are planted to grape varieties such as Nero d’Avola, Grecanico, Muscat Blanc, Moscato Giallo, Insolia, Merlot, Tannat, Viognier, and Chardonnay. The rest of the vineyards are various flora to encourage a diverse ecosystem. 

Sikele Bianco Terre Siciliane IGP 2016

Sikele Bianco is 100% Grecanico (aka: Garganega, of Soave) that’s macerated on the skins for 13 hours before pressing, followed by fermentation and six months’ aging in concrete. It’s unfiltered, unfined, and is bottled with just a dash of SO2. 

This orange (in color) wine is quite aromatic and actually smells a bit like oranges, and nuts, with a brisk, salty-air influence wound throughout. It has a beautifully rich texture, and is full of sweet & savory spices, peaches, and the same brisk-salty sensation that’s on the nose. 

Sikele Rosso Terre Siciliane IGP 2012

Sikele Rosso is 100% Nero d’Avola, fermented and aged in concrete for 9 months, also bottled unfiltered, unfined, and with just a dash of SO2. 2012 was a very hot and dry vintage across southern Italy and Sicily, but it was saved from producing hot clunkers by cooler temps and rain right before harvest time. This wine is aging quite nicely, with the red fruit becoming less primary, tobacco notes emerging, and a stony-minerality throughout. 

G.D. Vajra Langhe Rosso 2016, Piedmont, Italy

G.D. Vajra was officially established in 1972 but the family roots in the region go back over two centuries. The estate, well-known and respected for Barolo, sits 400 meters above sea level in the village of Vergne, in the commune of Barolo. Today the estate is over 40 hectares, 10 of which are planted to Nebbiolo for Barolo production. Farming here is organic, grapes are hand-harvested, and aging is done in traditional Slavonian casks.

The Langhe Rosso is a blend of Barbera, Nebbiolo, Dolcetto, Freisa, Pinot Noir, and Albarossa. Grapes are fermented separately in stainless steel, then aged for 12-16 months before blending, followed by 3 months in bottle before releasing. It’s fruity, floral and spicy, with a touch of brambly underbrush and black pepper. It’s lively and bright, and a perfect dinner party wine. 

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM

January 25, 2019

Domaine Buronfosse Cotes du Jura Blanc ‘Les Belemnites’ 2012, Jura, France

Peggy & Jean-Pascal Buronfosse farm 4.5 hectares in a hamlet in the Jura foothills. Jean-François Ganevat and Julien Labet are their neighbors and friends, from whom they got help and advice when they were first starting out back in the early 2000s. They work naturally in the vineyard and cellar, avoiding additives and using only a touch of SO2, when at all. 

This white is a blend of Savagin and Chardonnay that spent 18 months on the lees. It’s lightly nutty (like walnuts) and salty, with oyster-shell minerality, and briny acidity. The fruit leans more toward apple and some subtle citrus. It’s beautifully fresh for 2012. Pair with shellfish, or try it with comte, the famous cheese of the region.

Here’s a website with a lot of info on the producers, but nothing on this particular wine.

Château de Trinquevedel 2017, Tavel, France

We’re fans of rosé in winter, and this one is particularly well-suited to cooler temps. We have a special price on this 2017, as well as a few others in the shop. They’re not our overstock, we’re buying more because they’re good, they’re on sale, and we love a deal! 

Guillaume Demoulin’s great-grandfather Eugène bought this eighteenth-century Southern Rhone château in 1936, the same year as the establishment of the Tavel AOC. Unfortunately the vineyards were in great disrepair and it wasn’t until 1960 that the vines were producing wines worthy of Demoulin’s standards. Tavel is the only A.O.C. entirely made up of rosé, so no red or white wine can bear the name of the cru. No more than sixty percent of the final blend can be made up of Grenache. 

This Tavel is a blend of 45% Grenache, 24% Cinsault, 15% Clairette, 10% Mourvèdre, and 6% Syrah from vines over 30 years old, planted on sand, marl, limestone, clay, and quartz. Fermentation is for 20 days in cement, then it’s aged in enamel-lined tanks and stainless steel for 6-9 months. The wine has a ripe red fruit quality, balanced by Rhone stony-freshness and spicy hillside herbs. Farmed sustainably.

Tenuta Ormanni, Chianti 2015, Tuscany, Italy

This 13th century estate has been in the Brini Batacchi family for the last 200 years and is today overseen by Paolo Brini Batacchi and his daughter Paola. It’s located between the towns of Poggibonsi and Castellina in Chianti and covers 597 acres, of which 168 are vineyards planted to Sangiovese. Fun fact: mention of this property and the Ormanni family can be found in Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy.

This Chianti is 95% Sangiovese and 5% Merlot that’s fermented and aged in cement for 12 months. It’s traditional and tasty, with notes of sour cherry, strawberries, oregano, and dried flowers. The tannins are light and fine-grained, and the acidity is fresh and food-friendly. Have it with what you’d expect: cured meats and cheeses, pasta with sauce (meat or tomato), roasted eggplant, polenta with mushrooms….   

Alfredo Maestro Viña Almate 2016 , Castilla y León, Spain

Alfredo Maestro’s family came from Basque Country to Castilla y León, on Spain’s northwestern border with Portugal. Alfredo grew up amongst vines and winemaking, and was always interested in pursuing winemaking himself. His first vintage was in 1998. He always farmed organically, but in the beginning, he farmed in “textbook” style, to make “correct” wines according to the Ribera del Duero wine-minds of the time. This meant using cultured yeasts, acids, enzymes, color enhancers, etc…This changed in the early 2000s when it occurred to him that it didn’t make any sense to farm organically and then use chemicals in the cellar. By 2003 he was making wine without any additives at all, including sulfur. This he says, is “to better tell the story of the land.” 

Viña Almate is 100% Tempranillo from 10-80 year-old vines in Peñafiel and Valtiendas, planted at 700 to 1000 meters elevation. It’s fermented in stainless steel, then aged for two to four months in neutral French oak. It’s an unfiltered, unfined, full-bodied, floral, spicy, satisfying red that will pair nicely with most things roasted and grilled.

Cheers!

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM

December 21, 2018

Put on your galoshes, hop those puddles, and be thankful we don’t have to shovel! Rain or shine, we’ve got a great tasting lined up this evening with Peter from Vineyard Road. Notes are below. 

We’re also having a special tasting on Sunday with Christin from Wine Bros., from 12:30 – 2pm. She’ll be pouring fizzies from Massachusetts and Maine. Swing on by, it’ll be fun!

Cheers! Merry Christmas! Safe Travels! 

Hild Morio-Muskat Secco 2016

Matthias Hild farms 5 hectares of old, terraced parcels in Upper-Mosel, a place a bit more known for quantity over quality, with most of the grapes going to cooperatives. Unlike the famed slate vineyards of lower Mosel, the vineyards here are mostly on limestone. And where Riesling makes up over 60% grapes planted in Mosel, Hild specializes in underdog grapes like Elbling, and this Morio-Muskat. Hild works his vineyards responsibly and is on the way toward organic certification.

This is a lightly fizzy, subtly sweet, snacking on apps, cooking dinner, greeting guests, wrapping presents, eating leftovers, just-one-more-little-sip-before-bed kind of wine.

Champagne Christophe Mignon Brut Nature NV

Christophe Mignon comes from a long line of farmers and winemakers in Le-Mesnil-le-Huttier This area in the Vallée de la Marne is known for its high percentage of Pinot Meunier, which is particularly well suited to the deep clay and chalky Tuffeaux soils that dominate the terrain. Christophe’s approach to farming is sometimes called the Mignon Method; it combines biodynamics, phytotherapy, homeopathy, and geobiology. He describes nature as a Rubik’s Cube, always offering up new challenges, so therefore he changes up his farming approach accordingly. He’s followed the lunar calendar for 20 years, allowing the moon’s cycles to dictate his work in the vineyards and in the cellar. He says “the moon for a vigneron is like a metronome for a musician.” To ensure low yields and the highest possible quality, he employs just one person per hectare. He prefers his wines on the drier side, so grapes are picked at optimum ripeness, thus allowing little to no dosage, and he uses very little sulfur.

This 100% Pinot Meunier is a 50/50 blend of two recent vintages, aged 24 months in bottle and finished without dosage. It’s dry and mineral driven, floral, expressive, red fruit scented, balanced and elegant.

Pierre Morey Bourgogne Blanc 2014

Domaine Pierre Morey is 11 hectares in Meursault planted to Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Aligote. The family traces its roots back here to 1793. They’ve been certified organic since 1992 and biodynamic since 1997. All of their wines are 100% de-stemmed, fermented with indigenous yeasts, not fined and/or filtered for reds, rarely for whites. In addition to his duties at his own property, from 1988 to 2008, Pierre was cellar master and manager at Domaine Leflaive in Puligny-Montrachet. Pierre’s daughter Anne Morey has been working with her father over the last few years and is now co-manager.

This Bourgogne Blanc is from 1.76ha of multiple parcels in Meursault (Les Millerands, En Monatine, Les Herbeux, Les Malpoiriers) on deep clay-limestone soils. It spends 16-20 months aging in older oak barrels and is bottled by gravity. This wine is floral, lightly spiced, balanced acidity, with notes of apples, pears, and honeysuckle on a classic rich Meursault palate.

Burlotto Dolcetto d’Alba 2017, Piedmont, Italy

Established in 1850 by Giovan Battista Burlotto, aka The Commendatore, presently G.B. Burlotto is a family run estate. The Commendatore’s great niece Marina Burlotto manages the winery. Her husband, Giuseppe Alessandria, manages the vineyards, and their son, Fabio, is the winemaker and in charge of marketing.

Note from the importer: Burlotto owns 15 hectares of vineyards at 280 to 360 meters elevation, located near the river Tanaro in Verduno, the northern most estate in Barolo. In the cellar Fabio works traditionally, selected wines are foot crushed, with minimal intervention, harvested grapes are destemmed, natural yeast ferments, extended skin contacts, and manual punch downs. The cooler night time temperatures of Verduno and meticulous work in the vineyards and in the cellar have enabled this estate to produce elegant, profound wines now considered among the very finest in Piedmont.

Domaine Jean-Marc et Thomas Bouley Hautes-Côtes de Beaune Rouge 2015

This 8.5 hectare property in Volnay & Côte de Beaune is farmed organically by father and son team Jean-Marc and Thomas Bouley. The grapes for this Hautes-Côtes de Beaune Rouge are from just under one hectare planted in 1979, 1980, 1999, and 2002.
The vineyards are on a south-facing hillside above Volnay, at 380m altitude, on red clay (oxidized iron) and limestone soil

Vinification: 100% de-stemmed, cold maceration in concrete or stainless steel tank. 2-3 weeks’ total tank time. 1 year aging on fine lees in older oak barrels.

2015 in Burgundy was a very good vintage for reds, and this is a lovely wine to drink now or lay down for a few years. Cherry, cranberry, a touch rustic, a little bit savory…it’ll be perfect on a holiday table or as a gift for the Burgundy or Pinot Noir lover.

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM

Thanksgiving picks with Peter from Vineyard Road.

Champ Divin, Crémant du Jura Zero Dosage, France (2014)

Domaine Champ Divin is a 5ha property located on the Jura Mountain’s ‘premier plateau’. It was founded in 2008 by Valerie and Fabrice Closset-Gaziaux, who both have degrees in soil and earth sciences. They worked for years as biodynamic consultants in South Africa and around France before returning home to the Jura. Here they grown Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, and Savagnin os shale, silty clay, and limestone in the village of Gevingey. Of course farming here is biodynamic, and wine-making is as hands-off as possible, with native yeast fermentations and limited sulfur use. Harvest is by hand and as late as possible to optimize phenolic ripeness.

This crémant is a co-fermentation of 70% Chardonnay and 30% Pinot Noir. It undergoes full malolactic fermentation in steel and then spends a minimum of 12 months in bottle on the lees before disgorgement. Although it’s zero dosage, it’s full of ripe fruit like pear, lime, green apple, and peach, and delicate flowers, like honeysuckle. It’s medium-bodied and and has a beautiful, ripe texture, punctuated by brisk minerality. This is a perfect sparkler to get the party started.

Arnaud Lambert ‘Brézé’ Clos du Midi Saumur Blanc, France (2017)

Château de Brézé has been around since at least the 15th century, when it was served to royalty and held in the same regard as Château d’Yquem. In the 1600s, the white wines of Château de Brézé were known throughout Europe as Chenin de Brézé.

In 2009, the new owner of the estate asked Yves Lambert and his son, Arnaud, from Domaine de Saint-Just, to manage the estate. They got a 25 year lease and began converting the estate to organic farming. In a little less than a decade, they’ve restored the wines to the heights they achieved centuries ago.

‘Clos du Midi’ is 100% Chenin Blanc from the colder sites on on the Brézé Hill. The upper section of the hill is sandy, while the bottom is richer in clay. Both are atop tuffeau, the chalky limestone rock made up of compressed marine organisms that lived in floating colonies in the prehistoric Turonian era. The differing soil types, coupled with the limestone, create a wine of great tension and depth, with a rounded palate punctuated by lively acidity, and balanced with notes of honey, dried fruit, and touch of lemon…it’s a gorgeous wine that always over delivers.

Anne-Sophie Dubois, ‘Les Cocottes’ Fleurie, France (2017)

Anne-Sophie Dubois comes from the Champagne region in France. Her parents have 3 hectares in Sezanne, but when they wanted to expand and offer their two kids more opportunities, they purchased an 8-hectare plot in Fleurie, where most of the vines had quite a bit of age on them, some exceeding 60 years old. Anne-Sophie took over this domaine in 2007, after internships at Roblet-Monnot in Volnay, and at various Champagne producers. Her early years here were marked with difficulty due to hail decimating her vines. But she persisted. She farms organically, and has a delicate touch in the cellar, with an emphasis on elegance and purity of fruit. Her wines undergo long macerations, fermentations are with wild yeasts, and there is no new oak, no filtration or fining, and no pumping – just gravity.

Les Cocottes is the only cuvée Anne-Sophie Dubois vinifies whole cluster *with* carbonic maceration (the remainder are traditionally fermented, in the Burgundian style, without carbonic). “Les Cocottes” means “the chicks”, and this is what Anne-Sophie drinks when she’s kicking back with her friends. It’s a fruit-forward style that doesn’t sacrifice any character; it’s full of raspberries, cherries, and other red berries, along with crackling minerality, earthy pepper notes, and fresh & zesty acidity. It’s fun and gluggable.

Bichi, La Flama Roja, Mexico (2017)

Notes from the importer: Mexico has a centuries-long history of winemaking that has mostly gone under the radar. Spanish conquistadores planted vines in the early 1500’s, before both Chile and Argentina, and Baja California represents about 90% of the vines in the entire country due to the ideal climate and geography. Brothers Noel & Jair Tellez, with the help of Chilean (by way of Burgundy) winemaker Louis-Antoine Luyt, are producing amazingly fresh and energetic wines from very old, recently recovered vineyards of Misión (aka Listán Prieto), Rosa del Peru (aka Moscatel Negro), Tempranillo and Carinena, among other varieties. Bichi means “naked” in some parts of northern Mexico, and for Téllez and Luyt, it thus seemed like an appropriate name to give their new natural wine project. Based at the Téllez family ranch in Tecate, just over the border from California, Bichi farms 10 hectares of their own Tecate vineyards biodynamically and collaborates with a growing family of organic farmers working vineyard land in Tecate and around Valle de Guadalupe. The majority of the vines are head-trained and all are dry-farmed, handharvested, fermented with native yeast, and aged in neutral barrel or vat so that the emphasis is on each wine’s Mexican terruño.

Flama Roja comes from the Téllez family’s high elevation (2500 feet) home vineyard in Tecate – young vines of Cabernet Sauvignon, Tempranillo, and Nebbiolo, which they planted themselves in 2004 and farm biodynamically, just like their vegetable and herb gardens. The grapes were harvested by hand, de-stemmed and co-fermented in locally made concrete tinajas with 30 days of maceration, raised in a mix of steel tank and used French barrels over winter, and bottled without fining or filtration and only 10ppm of added SO2. Flama Roja is a well-structured, medium-bodied Pacific red wine with bright acidity, red/black fruit and firm tannins. 333 cases produced.

Wine Tasting in the Shop!

¡Hola!

Who needs wine and pleasant diversions?! We do!! Tonight in the shop, Alvaro de la Viña will be here with not one, not two, but THREE of the winemakers he represents through his importing company Selections de la Viña. We first came across Alvaro back in late 2012 or early 2013, but it took far too long to get his delicious, place-driven, honest wines into little Rhody. Now we have a bunch! Swing by tonight to swirl, sip, and meet the people who make what’s in your glass. You’re bound to find something that would be just right for your holiday table, too.

Our Friday wine tasting is still happening tomorrow, 5-8PM, so save room in the schedule. Nick Zeiser from Wine Wizards (who also reps Selections de la Viña in RI) will be pouring a line-up of Hermann J. Wiemer wines from the Finger Lakes, NY. These too, will pair quite well with the cornucopia of flavors that pile up like autumn leaves on Thanksgiving tables.

And this Saturday in the shop, 3-6PM, Matt Thomas from Sierra Nevada will host our beer tasting.

¡Salud!

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop, 5-8PM

Nov. 2, 2018

Christin from Wine Bros pours this fun and funky line-up!

Fable Farm Fermentory “Leo” 2017 Barnard, Vermont

Fable Farm Fermentory is a farm-based winery producing aged wines and vinegars, among other herbal elixirs. It’s a collective effort of many folks, including Christopher Piana, Andrew White, and Jon Piana, located in the foothills of the Green Mountains in Barnard, VT. Their farm is a mosaic of fields, forests, and gardens rich with ecological diversity situated at 1700 feet, atop the Broad Brook watershed. They work cooperatively with partner farmers and advocates to steward the historic Clark Farm. Now conserved by the Vermont Land Trust, this 450 acre haven is a living legacy of the european settlers who sculpted small farms out of an old-growth wilderness back in the late 1700’s. Over the last five years, Fable Farm has grafted and grown hundreds of cider-specific apple and pear trees in nursery beds peppered around Barnard. Fable Farm is a fermentory, a venue, and a culinary company providing farm fresh prepared foods for various cultural events held on the farm.

Leo is a dry, sparkling, orange wine made from 40% Le Crescent grapes & 60% cider apples. Half of the grapes were placed into an open top vessel directly from the destemmer for a partial whole berry maceration and the other half was pressed immediately. This “orange” wine contains both the macerated and non-macerated La Crescent grape fermentations, blended with a carefully selected multi-year entourage of cider barrels. They dissolved in Barnard-bred maple syrup at bottling for a traditional method sparkling at 9.5% abv.

Domaine de Grisy Bourgogne Blanc 2016, Burgundy
(late addition, not pictured)

Domaine de Grisy is a 22 acre vineyard located in the northern part of Burgundy near Chablis in the town of Saint-Bris-le-Vineux. Way up north in the Côtes d’Auxerre, Pascal Sorin’s family has been making wine here for 18 generations. He currently runs the estate with his wife. Fermented in stainless steel with indigenous yeast. Sustainably farmed Chardonnay vines located just south of Chablis in Côtes d’Auxerre. Chalky soil. Aged in stainless steel and bottled with minimal additions. Soils are Kimmeridgian clay and limestone. The 2017 vintage has a pale yellow color, with aromas of white flowers, almonds and toast. On the palate the great minerality brings out the typicity of our soils with a creamy side, then finish on the flavors of honey.

Domaine Mamaruta Fitou, France

Domaine Mamaruta is a small estate situated near the Pyrenees mountain range, facing the Mediterranean Sea. Producer Marc Castan describes this area as looking like paradise, and is determined to make the best wine he can with as little impact on the environment as possible. Marc inherited vines from his grandfather, and at first worked for the village cooperative. He quickly learned that this kind of intensive farming wasn’t for him. In 2009 he started his own winery, with the objective of bringing the vineyard back to life after years of industrial farming. Nowadays Domaine Mamaruta is 14ha and is entirely located near the shores of the villages of La Palme and Leucate. Many different terroirs can be found in the area with a mix of sand and pebbles at water-level, and dry, compact lime-stone soils on the cliffs’ plateau. Yields are very low, partly due to pruning style, and partly due to the harsh, dry environment. Varieties planted are Carignan noir and blanc, Mouvèdre, Syrah, Grenache noir and gris, as well as Macabeu and Muscat Petit Grains. There is usually more than one grape variety in the same plot because the preference here throughout generations has been to replace a dead vine with another vine, whatever the variety, rather than leave a hole in the row.

Marc works methodically, by hand, and makes biodynamic tinctures from plants like chamomile, lavender, rosemary, dandelion or nettle, which are planted amongst the rows, along with other flowers and beneficial plants. These are used along with clippings from the vines to make compost. The property is also home to Marc’s dozen or so Highland cows, and two donkeys, which are referred to as the “lawnmowers”. The animals graze between the rows and provide natural fertilizer to the ecosystem.

Un Grain de Folie Rosé 2017

A rosé made from 60% Syrah and 40% other varietals from the estate. (In 2017 it was all Carignan.) Soils are rich in limestone. Direct press into stainless steel. Native Yeasts. Kept on lees with no stirring and aged in tank for 6 months. No temperature control. Unfined and unfiltered. No added sulfites during fermentation. Vegan. 36 mg/L SO2 added at bottling. Fresh and clean, with great texture. All strawberries and minerals. Absolutely delicious.

Razzia Fitou 2017

AOP Fitou. 40% Carignan noir – 20% Grenache – 20% Cinsault – 20% Syrah. Native yeasts. Whole bunches macerated for just 7 days. After a very gentle pressing, the juice is moved to barrels to finish fermentation and rest on the lees for 5 months. Blackcurrants and dark cherries, leather, and spices characterize this wine. Unfined. Filtered. Total Sulphites: 10 mg/L

Fattoria San Lorenzo Marche “Il Casolare” Rosso 2017

50% Sangiovese / 50% Montepulciano fermented in concrete tanks with native yeasts. Il Casolare Rosso is Natalino’s ‘red wine for the people.’ Natalino, the wine maker declassifies this ‘Piceno’ as an IGT in order to save on costs, keeping the price as low as possible. The wine is fresh, clean, balanced, easy to drink, and certified organic. Fattoria San Lorenzo is a third generation family winery that is completely organic and biodynamic. Enrico Crognaletti was a master cooper who founded the estate, and handed it down to his son Gino, who spent his life filling the vineyards of his estate with the best clones of Verdicchio from around the area. Gino left the estate to Natalino Crognaletti, who’s been running things ever since. Under Natalino’s guidance, the estate has seen its wines imported to all corners of the globe, and developed to become standard bearers for the Marche. All the vineyards are organically and biodynamically farmed, and are certified organic for wine and olive oil production. All of the farming is done by hand to best preserve the soil, vines and the larger environment.

Friday Wine Tasting in the Shop with Chris Wichern + German Wine; 5-8PM

Oct. 26, 2018

Hild Elbling, Mosel, Germany

Matthias Hild farms 5 hectares of old, terraced parcels of Elbling in Upper-Mosel, a place a bit more known for quantity over quality, with most of the grapes going to cooperatives. Elbling is an ancient grape (one of Europe’s oldest) that is still planted in this region, though not much anywhere else. Its history isn’t known for certain, but it’s either indigenous to Germany, or was brought there by the Romans nearly 2,000 years ago. DNA testing links it to Gouais Blanc, an ancient variety of white grape planted in Northern and Central France throughout the Medieval era. It grew where Pinot and Chardonnay didn’t do well, and made simple acid-driven wines for the peasantry. It is also a descendant of Traminer, a finicky, green-skinned grape from a German speaking area in what is now northern Italy. This parentage links Elbling to Riesling, Chardonnay, and Furmint. It makes high acid, tart, low alcohol, wines and it is particularly well-suited to sparkling wines.

Unlike the famed slate vineyards of lower Mosel, the vineyards here are mostly on limestone. And where Riesling makes up over 60% of grapes planted in Mosel, Elbling is the least planted, at just under 6%. It’s more a labor of love for Hild than a successful financial venture. Hild works his vineyards responsibly and is on the way toward organic certification.

Here’s what the importer has to say: The fact that Matthias is single-handedly trying to save the old, terraced parcels of Elbling is a move that is equal parts romantic and completely insane. The financial realities of working these vineyards by hand while accepting their lower yields simply do not add up. This is an act of cultural preservation more than anything else. He calls the wine “Zehnkommanull” which means simply 10% — the wine always ferments bone dry and is 10% ABV or less. The few cases that I’m able to get of this wine are, to me at least, semi-sacred voices of a time long past. Sacred voices that end up on the $20-and-under table and most often overlooked.

We’ll pour the 2017 Elbling Trocken and the NV Brut Sekt. These are spirited, zippy, start-the-party wines.

Eva Fricke Rheingau Riesling Trocken 2017

Eva Fricke is not from Rheingau and she is not from a winemaking family. But she went to oenological school, and after finishing her studies she did wine stints in Bordeaux, Piedmont, Ribera del Duero, and Australia. She settled in the lower Rheingau area of Lorch, where she is biodynamically farming steep-sloped, low-yielding plots that were forgotten (or intentionally avoided) by the larger producers because they’re so difficult to work. The vineyards are on loess, clay, slate, and quartzite soils.

This Riesling has the touch of richness that Fricke’s wines tend to exhibit, along with peaches, lime-zest, and mouth-watering, precise minerality. Here’s more on Eva Fricke.

Shiba Wichern Willamette Cuvée Pinot Noir and Havlin Pinot Noir

All notes from Chris: The main goals are balance and elegance. As it turns out a great way to do this is via minimal intervention during ferment and cellaring. On the other hand it requires that we spend a lot of time in the vineyard during the growing season and during harvest for field sorting. One thing that Akiko insists on doing differently from a very big portion of the industry -big or small- is actually work the vineyards ourselves. Our grapes don’t grow in picking bins on flatbed trucks. She refuses to hire a crew to do the field work. Almost every step is done by Akiko, friends & family and me. This gives Akiko such a high level of control and understanding of the grapes, the importance of which should not be under estimated.

Finally, Akiko much like the Japanese cliché, observes, learns and collects what she deems to be the best practices for wine-making. Implementing what she learns is not always easy and sometimes doesn’t work out as we expect, but that is also key to the learning process. Over the past 5 harvests we have worked out a lot of kinks. Give us about 20-25 more years and we might actually admit to knowing what we are doing…

2014 Willamette Cuvée

Our goal with the Willamette Cuvée is to offer an excellent quality Pinot Noir at a very approachable price. At the same time we try to capture a little bit of character from each of our three vineyards and present them as a well-balanced package. Mild red and black fruits from the Havlin Vineyard, smells of summer-forest and black tea from Barrett Hill Vineyard and powerful dark fruits and spices from Eola Springs Vineyard all play well together to make the Willamette Cuvée complex, but not muddled. As the wine breathes the character continues to expand and present more depth.

Food pairings with the Willamette Cuvée are easy, because it goes well with everything. That statement isn’t very useful. So, try it with roasted pork, which is the go-to-meal for Pinot Noir. Try it with Asian food like Korean Barbeque or Japanese Pizza (okonomiyaki). For Sushi, however, it’d be better to stick with our Rosé. You can also drink the Willamette Cuvée with no more accompaniment than the glass you poured it in.

Willamette Cuvée was blended after barrel ageing in 12% new French Oak for a little over 18 months and has been in the bottle since May 1st, 2016. Details about cellaring and grapes can be found in the single vineyard descriptions.

2014 Havlin Vineyard Pinot Noir

Havlin Vineyard is in Perrydale directly in the so-called Van Duzer Corridor, which is known for bringing cold coastal winds to the Willamette Valley in the afternoon and evening. These winds are exactly what Pinot Noir grapes need for balanced ripening, in other words developing sugar and flavor while retaining acidity. We made 137 cases of Havlin, which is 5 and one half barrels.

The 2014 Havlin retains a lot of its Havlin-ness (strong black and red fruits), but is at the same time very different from the 2013. In 2013 Havlin was our burliest wine –in as much as our wines are ever “burly.” In 2014 Havlin is feminine, subtle and almost delicate, but It still shows the very punchy red fruit that we had in 2013. And the red fruit still evolves with time into the typical Oregon Pinot Noir black fruit and lavender, but now the amplitude of the fruit is more balanced with the tartness and other non-fruit tones.